liefplus
liefplus:

i actualy kind of believe this, as i believe “alt lit” is more based on the community rather than qualities found in the writing, and i think beach sloth may be the person who is most comprehensively conected across the various “alt lit” sub-communities

The Golden Ratio of Alt Lit


                Steve Roggenbuck suggests the more mutual friends one has in common with Beach Sloth; the more one is ‘in the alt lit game’. Over one hundred comments long the Facebook thread is certainly epic. While not on par with the Bebe Zeva Facebook thread (which has over 38K comments, bless its soul) it brings up many interesting points and non-points. What is a Facebook? How can it be used to attract new friends and fans? Is there a limit to friendship? Can friendship be friend blocked? And how does one embed oneself into the alt lit community?





                Facebook is a social networking site. People dig the bejesus out of Facebook. Many like it pretty hard. Some use Facebook to make new friends. Others use it to stalk their ex-girlfriends, ex-boyfriends, former friends, parents, children, etc. Facebook may be the best thing to happen to stalkers since anything. With Facebook people get to really know each other. Every ‘like’ on Facebook brings greater enlightenment. Ask Jackson Nieuwland. He knows Facebook likes. Jackson Nieuwland is the king of the likes on Facebook. Love him. Add him as a friend. Jackson Nieuwland will be your best Facebook friend.





               New friends and fans are important to Facebook. Friends can be added with ease. Fans never end. There is no limit to Facebook fans. In fact those really popular alt lit writers (Tao Lin, Steve Roggenbuck) have been ‘friend-blocked’ on Facebook. Apparently there is a limit to friendship. Facebook limits the number of friends to 5,000 people. It takes a village to raise a Facebook. This is the message one can take from Facebook’s ‘friend rationing’ scheme. 





               The limits of friendship can hurt. Facebook is the only social media site that practices such ‘malarkey’. Other sites will never deny anybody. Tumblr lets you follow as many people as its little overworked servers can allow. Twitter encourages people to be funny and insightful in such a small amount of characters. Blogspot encourages alt dads to blog about obscure topics that interest them and roughly 18 other people. Yes these are beautiful things. Alt lit uses all of them. What is the deciding factor about how to get involved in alt lit?





               Alt lit’s philosopher king Steve Roggenbuck states to add Beach Sloth as a friend on Facebook. That’s a start. Beach Sloth is on most social media platforms except instagram for obvious, anonymous reasons. Beach Sloth will remain anonymous until deep into the foreseeable future. Though in all fairness if someone wants to know about Beach Sloth, all the information is out there. Every tweet, blog posts, Facebook status update, all of it is fairly transparent. 





               Getting involved in alt lit is easy. Simply start creating culture. There are no rules for alt lit. Nobody bothered writing any down. Unlike previous writing groups/movements/art things/whatever somebody would call alt lit there appears to be no specific theme. In fact the only main theme for alt lit is to write about what you know. Considering how old that advice is and how long it has remained true, it is important to follow. Other than that there is nothing more to suggest. Adding Beach Sloth as a friend doesn’t make one alt lit, though it does make Beach Sloth very happy. And Beach Sloth is glad to have new friends and followers to cherish and hold. People are important and people deserve the support that any member of alt lit can give.





               Alt lit is about community. Without community alt lit is nothing.

liefplus:

i actualy kind of believe this, as i believe “alt lit” is more based on the community rather than qualities found in the writing, and i think beach sloth may be the person who is most comprehensively conected across the various “alt lit” sub-communities

The Golden Ratio of Alt Lit

                Steve Roggenbuck suggests the more mutual friends one has in common with Beach Sloth; the more one is ‘in the alt lit game’. Over one hundred comments long the Facebook thread is certainly epic. While not on par with the Bebe Zeva Facebook thread (which has over 38K comments, bless its soul) it brings up many interesting points and non-points. What is a Facebook? How can it be used to attract new friends and fans? Is there a limit to friendship? Can friendship be friend blocked? And how does one embed oneself into the alt lit community?

                Facebook is a social networking site. People dig the bejesus out of Facebook. Many like it pretty hard. Some use Facebook to make new friends. Others use it to stalk their ex-girlfriends, ex-boyfriends, former friends, parents, children, etc. Facebook may be the best thing to happen to stalkers since anything. With Facebook people get to really know each other. Every ‘like’ on Facebook brings greater enlightenment. Ask Jackson Nieuwland. He knows Facebook likes. Jackson Nieuwland is the king of the likes on Facebook. Love him. Add him as a friend. Jackson Nieuwland will be your best Facebook friend.

               New friends and fans are important to Facebook. Friends can be added with ease. Fans never end. There is no limit to Facebook fans. In fact those really popular alt lit writers (Tao Lin, Steve Roggenbuck) have been ‘friend-blocked’ on Facebook. Apparently there is a limit to friendship. Facebook limits the number of friends to 5,000 people. It takes a village to raise a Facebook. This is the message one can take from Facebook’s ‘friend rationing’ scheme. 

               The limits of friendship can hurt. Facebook is the only social media site that practices such ‘malarkey’. Other sites will never deny anybody. Tumblr lets you follow as many people as its little overworked servers can allow. Twitter encourages people to be funny and insightful in such a small amount of characters. Blogspot encourages alt dads to blog about obscure topics that interest them and roughly 18 other people. Yes these are beautiful things. Alt lit uses all of them. What is the deciding factor about how to get involved in alt lit?

               Alt lit’s philosopher king Steve Roggenbuck states to add Beach Sloth as a friend on Facebook. That’s a start. Beach Sloth is on most social media platforms except instagram for obvious, anonymous reasons. Beach Sloth will remain anonymous until deep into the foreseeable future. Though in all fairness if someone wants to know about Beach Sloth, all the information is out there. Every tweet, blog posts, Facebook status update, all of it is fairly transparent. 

               Getting involved in alt lit is easy. Simply start creating culture. There are no rules for alt lit. Nobody bothered writing any down. Unlike previous writing groups/movements/art things/whatever somebody would call alt lit there appears to be no specific theme. In fact the only main theme for alt lit is to write about what you know. Considering how old that advice is and how long it has remained true, it is important to follow. Other than that there is nothing more to suggest. Adding Beach Sloth as a friend doesn’t make one alt lit, though it does make Beach Sloth very happy. And Beach Sloth is glad to have new friends and followers to cherish and hold. People are important and people deserve the support that any member of alt lit can give.

               Alt lit is about community. Without community alt lit is nothing.