Anatomy of the Monster by Dolan Morgan

                Dolan Morgan’s story explores the thinking behind a true monster. In his tale, a young understudy and a wise old doctor set sail on the high seas. The seas are intoxicated with substances illegal in most areas of the world. Upon hitting land, or, as the doctor puts it ‘Land, ho’ they immediately meet with a suspiciously animated mayor. Watching the mayor they grow alarmed. The mayor’s violent tendencies are on display as he gyrates maniacally and injures lamps, the only things left to light up his dark life. How can the monster be properly defeated? A true ‘shape-shifter’ the monster lurks everywhere yet nowhere. No true description exists of the dastardly beast. Rather the defenses are put up in hopes of ruining the nasty beast that preys upon the poor townsfolk. With a wall they hope to keep the monster out but that proves to be woefully inadequate. 

                Conventional methods to kill the beast are useless. Tupperware containers cannot contain the vile beast. Rather the vile beast laughs at Tupperware containers since it has no need to store food. Everything the beast wants the beast eats. Besides the beast lacks a fridge to store the human remains. Even if the monster did have a fridge, it would still need a microwave. With a microwave it could efficiently heat up dead bodies of its victims, usually putting in the human bodies for about two and a half minutes. Being a relatively sophisticated monster, the monster is part of the ‘slow food’ movement. The monster’s involvement in the slow food movement explains why it preys on the slow and weak. Getting those weaklings makes its job so much easier. 

                Things go out of control. Despite the best efforts of the doctor to defeat the monster, the monster remains. Fortunately for the good doctor they pay him quite handsomely. Slowly but surely he loads his ship up with gold, silver, and various luxury goods. Upon further investigation the doctor discovers a terrible secret. How he deals with a speaking toe is immeasurably cruel. Toes need to speak. Toes need their space. Confined to shoes toes lack the ability to really say what’s on their minds. Oftentimes all toes want is a little piece of mind, something to function with, like glasses. One toe in particular has a penchant for life insurance. Falling in love with a young strapping lad the lovely couple goes off gallivanting into the wilderness searching for each other and hoping to start a family. 

                Sadly things turn quite sour for the monster. Alone with no friends the monster lives a sad life. There’s no sympathy for the monster. Dolan Morgan makes that painfully clear. Through his epic tale, Dolan points out the beauty of being good to one another.

Anatomy of the Monster by Dolan Morgan

                Dolan Morgan’s story explores the thinking behind a true monster. In his tale, a young understudy and a wise old doctor set sail on the high seas. The seas are intoxicated with substances illegal in most areas of the world. Upon hitting land, or, as the doctor puts it ‘Land, ho’ they immediately meet with a suspiciously animated mayor. Watching the mayor they grow alarmed. The mayor’s violent tendencies are on display as he gyrates maniacally and injures lamps, the only things left to light up his dark life. How can the monster be properly defeated? A true ‘shape-shifter’ the monster lurks everywhere yet nowhere. No true description exists of the dastardly beast. Rather the defenses are put up in hopes of ruining the nasty beast that preys upon the poor townsfolk. With a wall they hope to keep the monster out but that proves to be woefully inadequate. 

                Conventional methods to kill the beast are useless. Tupperware containers cannot contain the vile beast. Rather the vile beast laughs at Tupperware containers since it has no need to store food. Everything the beast wants the beast eats. Besides the beast lacks a fridge to store the human remains. Even if the monster did have a fridge, it would still need a microwave. With a microwave it could efficiently heat up dead bodies of its victims, usually putting in the human bodies for about two and a half minutes. Being a relatively sophisticated monster, the monster is part of the ‘slow food’ movement. The monster’s involvement in the slow food movement explains why it preys on the slow and weak. Getting those weaklings makes its job so much easier. 

                Things go out of control. Despite the best efforts of the doctor to defeat the monster, the monster remains. Fortunately for the good doctor they pay him quite handsomely. Slowly but surely he loads his ship up with gold, silver, and various luxury goods. Upon further investigation the doctor discovers a terrible secret. How he deals with a speaking toe is immeasurably cruel. Toes need to speak. Toes need their space. Confined to shoes toes lack the ability to really say what’s on their minds. Oftentimes all toes want is a little piece of mind, something to function with, like glasses. One toe in particular has a penchant for life insurance. Falling in love with a young strapping lad the lovely couple goes off gallivanting into the wilderness searching for each other and hoping to start a family. 

                Sadly things turn quite sour for the monster. Alone with no friends the monster lives a sad life. There’s no sympathy for the monster. Dolan Morgan makes that painfully clear. Through his epic tale, Dolan points out the beauty of being good to one another.