I Made the Mistake of Starting a Small Press and So Can You by Spencer Madsen

                Spencer Madsen is the kind of guy who sets up a small publishing press. What Sorry House has accomplished is simply incredible. The books Sorry House puts out are quality, the kind of things people read, celebrate, pay attention to and review. Of course with the large amount of experience Spencer Madsen has with the world he’s learned a few things. Due to his incredible giving spirit he decided to share the main lessons from his experience. 

                Basics are basic. Everybody should care about themselves. Nobody cares about writing as much as the actual writer. Hence people ought to care about their work. Anger is recommended by the illustrious mad Spencer Madsen. It is impossible to spell Madsen without ‘mad’. Millions of books come out every year and most of them look akin to cheap trash. Sorry House apologizes for a great many things. Design has never been one of those things. A Sorry House book has an aesthetic; they are things of true-ass beauty. Work is necessary to make the books more than collections of words into artifacts. 

                Freedom rules over the small press world. Gmail accounts are simply the beginning of any small press. Eventually the press grows gradually. Thankfully the small presses have a lot of nimble skills to find their way into readers’ hands. Opportunities abound for small press writers. Without any sort of template they can do essentially whatever they want. What this means is the offensive, the deeply weird, the social media presence, this gives the potential fence sitter a reason to get off the fucking fence. People need to get off the fence anyway; it is an uncomfortable temporary position at the very best. 

                Technical advice from Spencer Madsen pretty much is worth its weight in gold. Words carry a lot of weight. Experience does too. Spencer Madsen knows his stuff about how to handle a small press. A number of pitfalls exist for small presses, attempts to get their money and siphon it off. Printing and mailing can be done for cheap. Various pieces of advice about how to print, what to use to mail it out, and most importantly how to pay writers are of the utmost importance for anybody. 

                Unfortunately the marketplace is tough. Upton Sinclair wrote about social justice in ‘The Jungle’ yet there are plenty of places to get idealism exploited. Seemingly welcoming places are anything but. The more control a small press can get the better off they will be. Giant institutions exist to try and get a thumb in the pie, ruining the deliciousness for everyone. Better is to avoid outright teaming up with the likes of Bowker, small press distribution, or Amazon. DIY makes sense for most art and it should make sense to plenty of artists trying to do it out of a garage, basement, or bedroom. Spencer Madsen knows his stuff and he has graciously shared it with the world.

I will never be beautiful enough to make us beautiful together by Mira Gonzalez 


                Mira Gonzalez describes life from a logical point of view. Throughout these poems she brings up recurring themes of drugs, alcohol, eating, sex and loneliness. Sex and loneliness can be the same thing. 

                Language used is hyper-specific. By using simple language Mira Gonzalez is able to describe deeper emotions. In order to accurately convey her feelings of loneliness which is not the same thing as sadness she describes the most mundane events of parties or waking up in the afternoon. History of her surroundings comes up. Sitting in her car becomes a comfortable experience. Disappointment rears its ugly head from relationships to an inability to breastfeed a small child. 

                One instance Mira wants to be a clam that buries itself under the sand. Every clam that buries itself makes a choice, to choose to disengage with its surrounding. Benefits of hiding are rampant for a clam. Seagulls have a harder time finding clams under the sand. Hence when a seagull needs a quick snack it will pick another clam, to fly up to the sun with and drop on the ground. The seagull will do this over and over again until the clam’s shell cracks. Mira later acknowledges these dead clams stating a piece of sand is not a piece of sand but a part of a dead clam shell. 

Creatures like the clam die so unremarkably that few notice. Hence the dead clam’s carcass blends into the sand itself a symbol of infinity. People try to avoid this feeling of the afterlife’s insignificance by building graveyards. People believe if they bury themselves in a large well-mowed green field that they will have lasting power. This assumption is false. Death is just part of life. Acceptance of the cycle of life is probably the hardest thing to understand. Some people fear death for their whole life. Those people never really live. Mira watches graveyards from the comfort of her car because she has jar coffee to finish. Outside of her car things are less knowable. She likes the security of being alone. Loneliness while sad has benefits like an extreme sense of calm. 

                Relationships bring something different than calm. Mira analyzes the people. A few times Mira meets a total weirdo like a guy afraid of elevators. That guy is afraid of commitment like ejaculating onto Mira’s stomach. That guy seems completely messed up. Moments occur where Mira wants to be as small as a little fairy guiding a person around. With great tininess comes little responsibility. Shrinking down into the size of nothing reduces the need to have anybody pay attention. Mira would nurture an earlobe relationship. Earlobes are the sweetest parts of a person’s body. Earlobes are the welcome mats of the ears. 

                Mira Gonzalez understands that being alone is fine. This is why much of the book deals with specific body parts, bones, hands, tip of the nose, back of the ear. Bodies are the most anxiety ridden things people have. ‘I will never be beautiful enough to make us beautiful together’ is the low-level anxiety of life perfected to an art form.

I will never be beautiful enough to make us beautiful together by Mira Gonzalez

                Mira Gonzalez describes life from a logical point of view. Throughout these poems she brings up recurring themes of drugs, alcohol, eating, sex and loneliness. Sex and loneliness can be the same thing. 

                Language used is hyper-specific. By using simple language Mira Gonzalez is able to describe deeper emotions. In order to accurately convey her feelings of loneliness which is not the same thing as sadness she describes the most mundane events of parties or waking up in the afternoon. History of her surroundings comes up. Sitting in her car becomes a comfortable experience. Disappointment rears its ugly head from relationships to an inability to breastfeed a small child. 

                One instance Mira wants to be a clam that buries itself under the sand. Every clam that buries itself makes a choice, to choose to disengage with its surrounding. Benefits of hiding are rampant for a clam. Seagulls have a harder time finding clams under the sand. Hence when a seagull needs a quick snack it will pick another clam, to fly up to the sun with and drop on the ground. The seagull will do this over and over again until the clam’s shell cracks. Mira later acknowledges these dead clams stating a piece of sand is not a piece of sand but a part of a dead clam shell. 

Creatures like the clam die so unremarkably that few notice. Hence the dead clam’s carcass blends into the sand itself a symbol of infinity. People try to avoid this feeling of the afterlife’s insignificance by building graveyards. People believe if they bury themselves in a large well-mowed green field that they will have lasting power. This assumption is false. Death is just part of life. Acceptance of the cycle of life is probably the hardest thing to understand. Some people fear death for their whole life. Those people never really live. Mira watches graveyards from the comfort of her car because she has jar coffee to finish. Outside of her car things are less knowable. She likes the security of being alone. Loneliness while sad has benefits like an extreme sense of calm. 

                Relationships bring something different than calm. Mira analyzes the people. A few times Mira meets a total weirdo like a guy afraid of elevators. That guy is afraid of commitment like ejaculating onto Mira’s stomach. That guy seems completely messed up. Moments occur where Mira wants to be as small as a little fairy guiding a person around. With great tininess comes little responsibility. Shrinking down into the size of nothing reduces the need to have anybody pay attention. Mira would nurture an earlobe relationship. Earlobes are the sweetest parts of a person’s body. Earlobes are the welcome mats of the ears. 

                Mira Gonzalez understands that being alone is fine. This is why much of the book deals with specific body parts, bones, hands, tip of the nose, back of the ear. Bodies are the most anxiety ridden things people have. ‘I will never be beautiful enough to make us beautiful together’ is the low-level anxiety of life perfected to an art form.