Red Death by Olivia Lilley and Mireille Ribiere

                Lovelorn characters become love-worn with the passage of time. Deep yearning for connection, any kind of connection, leads people to do terrible things. The connection between any two people can eventually break. Such is the inevitability of life when a relationship moves forward, gets weaker, and cycles back to become stronger. Aging does this quite a bit. Relationships see this happen a lot particularly when there is a theatrical phantom afoot. Whenever a phantom tries to find his meddlesome way into any relationship well things can get a tad complicated with it. No amount of law enforcement can stop it. Rather it takes a more hands on approach to get everything completely accurate. 

                The phantom is real. People try to not believe it that a phantom would bother with the Paris opera but there he is messing with them. Usually phantoms opt to haunt various families trying to take over an entire home. Haunting commercial real estate generally has little going for it. By haunting commercial real estate there are all these complications. In an opera house that is increased tenfold. Sure perhaps there is an abundance of wonderful seating, great views, comfy chairs, yet it is a bit hollow. People give themselves up for the opera sing their souls out and it hurts to watch at times. For nobody is there to truly understand them. The audience goes home. Their families support them. But for those lonely ones there is the phantom willing to be there for them no matter what. 

                For a while that obsessive, compulsive attention can be a bit endearing even romantic. The flame that burns brightly can become so easily extinguished. Better to pace. With pace the slow gradual understanding of one another becomes apparent in time. Rushing getting to know one another can result in great disappointment. Insane individuals like to hide behind their passion convincing others that theirs is their art. Ruses like this can be remarkably effective leading the other to avoid the telltale signs that this might not be the best possible idea. 

                Of course the obsessive compulsive relationships end badly. There is no other way. People from the outside intervene. They see what happens they have agency to make a difference. Maybe the insane artist will never be understood; maybe they will continue to be a phantom finding new haunts. At some point they too find new communities, places to linger where their faces will be unknown and new. And then the cycle will continue.

THE RUNAWAYS PRESENTS Red Death

                Ah yes it is that time of the year, the Runaways time. For this is their first new show without their blessed beloved space the Parlor. Beach Sloth sheds a tear for them, a big sloth tear. The Runaways work fairly hard at their craft diligently producing new works and bringing artists together. Audiences and critics agree that the Runaways are a delightful treat for the whole family. With a name like “Red Death” how could the Runaways not be family friendly?

                “Red Death” is a cryptic tale full of mystery, suspense, and some red death. In the play (spoiler alert) the red symbolizes lots of things, embarrassment, fear, betrayal, the color red, etc. To tell this story right the Runaways need help from viewers like you. Akin to PBS the various Runaways members have flocked together on what appears to be an attractive couch they stole from a grandmother. Grandmothers always have the best taste in furniture for their taste has aged much like their skin becoming cool yet pruned. 

                Olivia Lilley is the Artistic Director of the Runaways. Olivia Lilley’s title is presented as “Aristic Director” showing off the exquisite uniqueness of her vision, her vision which requires corrective lenses. She makes sure to stare at directly at the camera. Her mother may or may not be watching her YouTube clip. If Olivia Lilley’s mother is in fact reading this review (highly unlikely yet still probable) she should avoid watching the last six seconds of the clip where Olivia Lilley busts out a ‘dead on’ impression of her dearly beloved mother. According to Olivia Lilley’s spirited re-telling of the story her mother advised her to look at the camera.

                Judging from the rest of the video it appears Olivia Lilley and her partners in plays have heeded this wise advice. They are asking for money to rent a new space, a safe place for their happy actors. With great money comes great responsibility which is why they are not asking for too much. A lot of the video is full of spoilers talking about history, but people live in history all the time. Most of history is wasted sleeping anyway, some history. 

                Whoever fails to support the gallant efforts of the Runaways does not know what it means to be alive. To be alive is to support the arts to even turn one’s life into a work of art. The Runaways have dedicated themselves to art and they have no intention of running away.

THE RUNAWAYS PRESENTS Red Death

                Ah yes it is that time of the year, the Runaways time. For this is their first new show without their blessed beloved space the Parlor. Beach Sloth sheds a tear for them, a big sloth tear. The Runaways work fairly hard at their craft diligently producing new works and bringing artists together. Audiences and critics agree that the Runaways are a delightful treat for the whole family. With a name like “Red Death” how could the Runaways not be family friendly?

                “Red Death” is a cryptic tale full of mystery, suspense, and some red death. In the play (spoiler alert) the red symbolizes lots of things, embarrassment, fear, betrayal, the color red, etc. To tell this story right the Runaways need help from viewers like you. Akin to PBS the various Runaways members have flocked together on what appears to be an attractive couch they stole from a grandmother. Grandmothers always have the best taste in furniture for their taste has aged much like their skin becoming cool yet pruned. 

                Olivia Lilley is the Artistic Director of the Runaways. Olivia Lilley’s title is presented as “Aristic Director” showing off the exquisite uniqueness of her vision, her vision which requires corrective lenses. She makes sure to stare at directly at the camera. Her mother may or may not be watching her YouTube clip. If Olivia Lilley’s mother is in fact reading this review (highly unlikely yet still probable) she should avoid watching the last six seconds of the clip where Olivia Lilley busts out a ‘dead on’ impression of her dearly beloved mother. According to Olivia Lilley’s spirited re-telling of the story her mother advised her to look at the camera.

                Judging from the rest of the video it appears Olivia Lilley and her partners in plays have heeded this wise advice. They are asking for money to rent a new space, a safe place for their happy actors. With great money comes great responsibility which is why they are not asking for too much. A lot of the video is full of spoilers talking about history, but people live in history all the time. Most of history is wasted sleeping anyway, some history. 

                Whoever fails to support the gallant efforts of the Runaways does not know what it means to be alive. To be alive is to support the arts to even turn one’s life into a work of art. The Runaways have dedicated themselves to art and they have no intention of running away.

The Runaways present ‘I Saw The Best Minds of My Generation’


                The Runaways manage to put their feet to the pavement with this, their latest offering to the world. Olivia Lilley speaks to the camera alongside a couple of other people who appear to have just rolled out of bed. Yes bedhead is a hairstyle and it is fabulous. What The Runaways do with theater is a splendid thing indeed. Additionally the desire to compensate their actors is a nice touch for what is still quite a small venue. 

                Ever since Beach Sloth randomly encountered Olivia Lilley via the Internet he has remained a true friend of her unique artistic vision. In a world where Beach Sloth typically focuses on literature it is a nice respite to do something a little bit different. The Runaways do things differently, they always have and they always will. Whether they are focusing on the contemporary or the past they do things extremely well. 

                ‘I Saw The Best Minds of My Generation’ obviously looks past to the previous bad boys of literature. However it too looks at the often overlooked female writers of the Beat Generation. Too often the Beat Generation is remembered as a ‘boys club’ when actually there were a number of excellent female writers who contributed a great deal to the movement. History tends to be written by the winners and though no one in the Beat Generation comes close to ‘winning’ they at least gained control of the narrative. 

                Poets are fair game for The Runaways. Much of the Parlor’s focus has been on supporting current poets of the ‘whatever movement anybody is calling it at this moment in time’ variety. Labels have been thrown around: New Sincerity, Alt Lit, and Beach Sloth’s perennial favorite, the Tweet Generation. To date Beach Sloth is the only individual who uses the phrase Tweet Generation. At some point it might catch on, maybe. 

                Decades from now the Parlor will continue. They will have a remake of ‘I Saw The Best Minds of My Generation’ featuring those lovable scamps of the Tweet Generation. People will be in awe of everyone from that scene, how they later evolved to become well-respected writers or simply gave up and joined the workforce. It would be interesting to see that future play, to see how the present plays out in the future, who would bother even caring about what is going on right now. To do that The Runaways will require a great deal of money from their Kickstarter campaign. Anybody in a position to help out The Runaways really should. They are good people doing good work for the good of humanity.

The Runaways present ‘I Saw The Best Minds of My Generation’

                The Runaways manage to put their feet to the pavement with this, their latest offering to the world. Olivia Lilley speaks to the camera alongside a couple of other people who appear to have just rolled out of bed. Yes bedhead is a hairstyle and it is fabulous. What The Runaways do with theater is a splendid thing indeed. Additionally the desire to compensate their actors is a nice touch for what is still quite a small venue. 

                Ever since Beach Sloth randomly encountered Olivia Lilley via the Internet he has remained a true friend of her unique artistic vision. In a world where Beach Sloth typically focuses on literature it is a nice respite to do something a little bit different. The Runaways do things differently, they always have and they always will. Whether they are focusing on the contemporary or the past they do things extremely well. 

                ‘I Saw The Best Minds of My Generation’ obviously looks past to the previous bad boys of literature. However it too looks at the often overlooked female writers of the Beat Generation. Too often the Beat Generation is remembered as a ‘boys club’ when actually there were a number of excellent female writers who contributed a great deal to the movement. History tends to be written by the winners and though no one in the Beat Generation comes close to ‘winning’ they at least gained control of the narrative. 

                Poets are fair game for The Runaways. Much of the Parlor’s focus has been on supporting current poets of the ‘whatever movement anybody is calling it at this moment in time’ variety. Labels have been thrown around: New Sincerity, Alt Lit, and Beach Sloth’s perennial favorite, the Tweet Generation. To date Beach Sloth is the only individual who uses the phrase Tweet Generation. At some point it might catch on, maybe. 

                Decades from now the Parlor will continue. They will have a remake of ‘I Saw The Best Minds of My Generation’ featuring those lovable scamps of the Tweet Generation. People will be in awe of everyone from that scene, how they later evolved to become well-respected writers or simply gave up and joined the workforce. It would be interesting to see that future play, to see how the present plays out in the future, who would bother even caring about what is going on right now. To do that The Runaways will require a great deal of money from their Kickstarter campaign. Anybody in a position to help out The Runaways really should. They are good people doing good work for the good of humanity.


The Interview Process: Olivia Lilley
                Olivia Lilley is an up and coming playwright. People got to step up their game to compete with Lilley’s tough as nails game. In her most recent play ‘THAT what makes her an icon’ she kicks out the un-metaphorical jams. Beach Sloth was fortunate enough to sit down with this rising-ass star and ask her a few deep personal questions about her views on art and shower curtains. 
Question 1: What makes someone an icon?
A person becomes an icon when young people start aspiring to become them when they grow up.
Question 2: Why do you work with this specific format? Why not poetry or prose? Why plays?
I like the playwriting because it allows for multiple people to experience something at the same time and watch other people experiencing it around them. Like everybody is taking a shit together. When I was little, I thought doing things in groups was just awful. It took forever for a group to leave and actually go someplace. I much preferred doing things alone. But sometimes, like at the midnight showing of one of the Harry Potters, being in a group was the most powerful thing in the world, experiencing something altogether. So like being in love, its highs are HIGH and its lows are LOWS. I guess that’s how I like my art.
Question 3: The play takes place in several different cities. Is this a way of saying all of America’s youth is the same?
I wanted to write a play that would be a “My Generation” play. I was looking to the film “Reality Bites” as inspiration. I feel like, in the 21st century, it would be appropriate for stories in multiple cities to intersect the way people in the same apartment complex in the 90’s did. The world is much smaller. I wanted this to reflect that. Also, I don’t necessarily think all youth are the same, but I do think that a computer programmer and a singer songwriter from the Mountains of Virginia have a lot in common.
Question 4: Hey baby
Hey
Question 5: Do you think love is a mostly sad or happy experience?
Like I said, love is full of very high highs and very low lows. Or maybe that’s just being young and infatuated. I don’t know if I have ever been “in love”. But I have certainly been young and infatuated.
Question 6: Billy Joel plays in the background in one particular scene. Is there another non-Billy Joel song you could have used?
I love the phrase “When will you realize Vienna waits for you?” It is such a positive message. Like if you have a dream, you will achieve it. You just have to decide when. I think more people should think like that. If they did, more would get done. So no, I don’t think there’s another song that could go there.
Question 7: Is partying a major part of your life?
I used to get paid to party. I was a club promoter. Usually I am the first one who falls asleep at the party. But occasionally, I’m the last.
That’s when I’m not “on the job”.
Question 8: Are you a punk rock kid?
I wish. No, unfortunately, I was a musical theatre kid.
Question 9: What do you miss most about your childhood?
I miss not having to work a day job.
Question 10: What art movements are you most excited for in the future?
Alt lit. 
Question 11: If you could have an ideal shower curtain what would it look like?
I used to have the ideal shower curtain. It was Gene Kelly’s shadow during singing in the rain, aqua colored, frolicking amongst falling aqua colored droplets.
"Singing in the rain"


I want my play to give people a hug - Olivia Lilley

The Interview Process: Olivia Lilley

                Olivia Lilley is an up and coming playwright. People got to step up their game to compete with Lilley’s tough as nails game. In her most recent play ‘THAT what makes her an icon’ she kicks out the un-metaphorical jams. Beach Sloth was fortunate enough to sit down with this rising-ass star and ask her a few deep personal questions about her views on art and shower curtains. 

Question 1: What makes someone an icon?

A person becomes an icon when young people start aspiring to become them when they grow up.

Question 2: Why do you work with this specific format? Why not poetry or prose? Why plays?

I like the playwriting because it allows for multiple people to experience something at the same time and watch other people experiencing it around them. Like everybody is taking a shit together. When I was little, I thought doing things in groups was just awful. It took forever for a group to leave and actually go someplace. I much preferred doing things alone. But sometimes, like at the midnight showing of one of the Harry Potters, being in a group was the most powerful thing in the world, experiencing something altogether. So like being in love, its highs are HIGH and its lows are LOWS. I guess that’s how I like my art.

Question 3: The play takes place in several different cities. Is this a way of saying all of America’s youth is the same?

I wanted to write a play that would be a “My Generation” play. I was looking to the film “Reality Bites” as inspiration. I feel like, in the 21st century, it would be appropriate for stories in multiple cities to intersect the way people in the same apartment complex in the 90’s did. The world is much smaller. I wanted this to reflect that. Also, I don’t necessarily think all youth are the same, but I do think that a computer programmer and a singer songwriter from the Mountains of Virginia have a lot in common.

Question 4: Hey baby

Hey

Question 5: Do you think love is a mostly sad or happy experience?

Like I said, love is full of very high highs and very low lows. Or maybe that’s just being young and infatuated. I don’t know if I have ever been “in love”. But I have certainly been young and infatuated.

Question 6: Billy Joel plays in the background in one particular scene. Is there another non-Billy Joel song you could have used?

I love the phrase “When will you realize Vienna waits for you?” It is such a positive message. Like if you have a dream, you will achieve it. You just have to decide when. I think more people should think like that. If they did, more would get done. So no, I don’t think there’s another song that could go there.

Question 7: Is partying a major part of your life?

I used to get paid to party. I was a club promoter. Usually I am the first one who falls asleep at the party. But occasionally, I’m the last.

That’s when I’m not “on the job”.

Question 8: Are you a punk rock kid?

I wish. No, unfortunately, I was a musical theatre kid.

Question 9: What do you miss most about your childhood?

I miss not having to work a day job.

Question 10: What art movements are you most excited for in the future?

Alt lit. 

Question 11: If you could have an ideal shower curtain what would it look like?

I used to have the ideal shower curtain. It was Gene Kelly’s shadow during singing in the rain, aqua colored, frolicking amongst falling aqua colored droplets.

"Singing in the rain"

I want my play to give people a hug - Olivia Lilley

THAT’S what makes her an Icon by Olivia Lilley
                In ‘THAT’s what makes her an Icon’ there’s a bunch of disappointment. This is known as ‘growing up’. None of the people in the play appear to be happy. Rather they have holding patterns. Each one sort of circles around what they are supposed to do or not do. Hopes are brought up over and over again. Occasionally these are teased for a little bit. People hook up. For millions of twenty-somethings hooking up and hope is all that can be managed. Everything else is so far away. 
                Young bastions are shown throughout the country. Whether it is New York, Chicago, Atlanta or the Bay Area, these areas attract talent. The problem is whether or not the talent can meet its full potential. Generally it doesn’t. Olivia’s unfortunate characters try really hard to make it right. They listen to a lot of music. In fact one of the strains that draw all of these characters together is the love of music. It is in the background, whether punk or rap or something in between (though punk beats out Billy Joel any day of the goddamn week). Wherever they are music is the thing that pulls the people closer together whether in a physical sense (like in Chicago) or simply having it as a low-intensity background (like with Roar’s work in Atlanta, with the constant singing and performing). 
                The discussions are virtually absurd. Yet this is how people talk. Most conversations deal with the everlasting pop culture. For these artists (because they all are artists in their own way) the pervasive pop culture is unavoidable. Occasionally if they are successful enough they can elude it, like Craig does with his copy of Yeats. Sometimes they hate it. ‘Vogue’ Madonna’s big thing bothers two particular characters. Other characters are bothered by being a part of this massive machine, with over two hundred million votes like in Roar versus Avril. 
                Legacies loom over some of these characters. Others try to create legacies. Ian and Dave both know exactly how unlikely it is that either of them will have a legacy. Dave says as much while he watches as an old man performs on stage. William wants to be left alone about it. All William wants is to have his private past kept private. Whenever anybody brings it up he appears to get a tad bit uncomfortable. 
                Relationships are the saddest things about growing older. Here people see themselves getting pulled away. Some make it. Most don’t. They exist to comfort one another. They hug one another. All they want is a tiny sliver to show they succeeded in a small fashion. Many of them hope for something better but get sidetracked. One of them literally is sidetracked when their van breaks down and they are forced to settle down. Meanwhile others try to take advantage of a good thing, or grow crazy when that good thing never happens.
                ‘THAT’s what makes her an Icon’ is about youth. The youth are doomed. Yet it never feels hopeless for Lilley’s characters. Optimism for the future shines through and by the end of the play it feels earned. Characters make it not by what happens but by how they deal with it. And that’s as honest as it gets.

THAT’S what makes her an Icon by Olivia Lilley

                In ‘THAT’s what makes her an Icon’ there’s a bunch of disappointment. This is known as ‘growing up’. None of the people in the play appear to be happy. Rather they have holding patterns. Each one sort of circles around what they are supposed to do or not do. Hopes are brought up over and over again. Occasionally these are teased for a little bit. People hook up. For millions of twenty-somethings hooking up and hope is all that can be managed. Everything else is so far away. 

                Young bastions are shown throughout the country. Whether it is New York, Chicago, Atlanta or the Bay Area, these areas attract talent. The problem is whether or not the talent can meet its full potential. Generally it doesn’t. Olivia’s unfortunate characters try really hard to make it right. They listen to a lot of music. In fact one of the strains that draw all of these characters together is the love of music. It is in the background, whether punk or rap or something in between (though punk beats out Billy Joel any day of the goddamn week). Wherever they are music is the thing that pulls the people closer together whether in a physical sense (like in Chicago) or simply having it as a low-intensity background (like with Roar’s work in Atlanta, with the constant singing and performing). 

                The discussions are virtually absurd. Yet this is how people talk. Most conversations deal with the everlasting pop culture. For these artists (because they all are artists in their own way) the pervasive pop culture is unavoidable. Occasionally if they are successful enough they can elude it, like Craig does with his copy of Yeats. Sometimes they hate it. ‘Vogue’ Madonna’s big thing bothers two particular characters. Other characters are bothered by being a part of this massive machine, with over two hundred million votes like in Roar versus Avril. 

                Legacies loom over some of these characters. Others try to create legacies. Ian and Dave both know exactly how unlikely it is that either of them will have a legacy. Dave says as much while he watches as an old man performs on stage. William wants to be left alone about it. All William wants is to have his private past kept private. Whenever anybody brings it up he appears to get a tad bit uncomfortable. 

                Relationships are the saddest things about growing older. Here people see themselves getting pulled away. Some make it. Most don’t. They exist to comfort one another. They hug one another. All they want is a tiny sliver to show they succeeded in a small fashion. Many of them hope for something better but get sidetracked. One of them literally is sidetracked when their van breaks down and they are forced to settle down. Meanwhile others try to take advantage of a good thing, or grow crazy when that good thing never happens.

                ‘THAT’s what makes her an Icon’ is about youth. The youth are doomed. Yet it never feels hopeless for Lilley’s characters. Optimism for the future shines through and by the end of the play it feels earned. Characters make it not by what happens but by how they deal with it. And that’s as honest as it gets.