fornever – soundtrack 6.4


                Fornever creates an aggressive, rock-influenced album with ‘soundtrack’. Starting from the beginning Fornever wastes no time. Drums are these. Industrial influences are readily felt. Alongside this are so many beats kept surprising martial. When Fornever employs more ambient soundscapes the result is something filled with so much tension. For the most part the album deals with propulsive beat-filled songs. Melodies emerge out of the distorted sounds, creating a weird sensation. Keeping a broad array of sound Fornever keeps the mood very consistent. Little in the album offers a chance for hope. Everything feels downbeat. 

                Obvious debts are owed to early IDM records. ‘Silver Linings’ for one sounds similar to the Future Sound of London. Fornever appears influenced by their style and sound choice (such as the beats and fusion with classical). Aspects of early ‘Planet Mu’ releases can be felt throughout the album. ‘Running into Nothing’ feels like it could be a long-lost Mu-Siq track. By far the best track on the album has a far more ominous tone. Stretching out past the five minute mark it manages to create a rather bleak disturbing landscape. Towards the end of the album this approach overtakes the previous more beat-driven approach as the ambience rules. 

Songs that appear to reach or aim for a plateau of sound end before Fornever delivers on that hope. The failure to deliver on this expectation makes for a far more interesting album. Confounding the listener is what Fornever excels at with ‘Soundtrack’. By keeping the listener on their feet Fornever can accomplish so much more.

fornever – soundtrack 6.4

                Fornever creates an aggressive, rock-influenced album with ‘soundtrack’. Starting from the beginning Fornever wastes no time. Drums are these. Industrial influences are readily felt. Alongside this are so many beats kept surprising martial. When Fornever employs more ambient soundscapes the result is something filled with so much tension. For the most part the album deals with propulsive beat-filled songs. Melodies emerge out of the distorted sounds, creating a weird sensation. Keeping a broad array of sound Fornever keeps the mood very consistent. Little in the album offers a chance for hope. Everything feels downbeat. 

                Obvious debts are owed to early IDM records. ‘Silver Linings’ for one sounds similar to the Future Sound of London. Fornever appears influenced by their style and sound choice (such as the beats and fusion with classical). Aspects of early ‘Planet Mu’ releases can be felt throughout the album. ‘Running into Nothing’ feels like it could be a long-lost Mu-Siq track. By far the best track on the album has a far more ominous tone. Stretching out past the five minute mark it manages to create a rather bleak disturbing landscape. Towards the end of the album this approach overtakes the previous more beat-driven approach as the ambience rules. 

Songs that appear to reach or aim for a plateau of sound end before Fornever delivers on that hope. The failure to deliver on this expectation makes for a far more interesting album. Confounding the listener is what Fornever excels at with ‘Soundtrack’. By keeping the listener on their feet Fornever can accomplish so much more.

Ecovillage – EverythingIsChemical Virtual 7’ 7.3
Ecovillage did a fantastic job with this little “Virtual 7””.  I’m glad to see they’ve continued following their muse. With this  offering, they hone their craft and even strongly remind me of Future  Sound of London’s seminal 90s album “LifeForms”. Yes, they’ve started  reaching that level for me as they avoid the digital sound for something  a bit more organic. Each one of the tracks bleeds into the other, like  all good ambient albums, and the overall mood of the EP stays fairly  consistent.
“Nature  is Never a Strange Thing” makes frequent use of the sounds of nature.  Actually for about half the song they avoid being too loud, in order for  to contribute, not distract from the ambient sounds. The middle of the  album possesses the longest track “In All Spirits”. Occasionally in the  near-periphery I hear little fleeting tones. It’s well-crafted, lush,  and a good track to ‘spread out’.
In  the closer “Good News” I enjoy the crackling sound. The sound swells up  again yet there are a lot of textural things going on in the  background. It ends fairly slowly with what appears to be record player  static. Compared to the loud sound that preceded it, I liked the quiet  ending.
Overall  I’m glad to see Ecovillage getting more interested in the smaller  sounds. As their stock and trade appears to be ambient music, this is a  positive step. I’m excited to see that they are now part of a larger  “Virtual 7” community. Here’s hoping they keep on getting better.

Ecovillage – EverythingIsChemical Virtual 7’ 7.3

Ecovillage did a fantastic job with this little “Virtual 7””. I’m glad to see they’ve continued following their muse. With this offering, they hone their craft and even strongly remind me of Future Sound of London’s seminal 90s album “LifeForms”. Yes, they’ve started reaching that level for me as they avoid the digital sound for something a bit more organic. Each one of the tracks bleeds into the other, like all good ambient albums, and the overall mood of the EP stays fairly consistent.

“Nature is Never a Strange Thing” makes frequent use of the sounds of nature. Actually for about half the song they avoid being too loud, in order for to contribute, not distract from the ambient sounds. The middle of the album possesses the longest track “In All Spirits”. Occasionally in the near-periphery I hear little fleeting tones. It’s well-crafted, lush, and a good track to ‘spread out’.

In the closer “Good News” I enjoy the crackling sound. The sound swells up again yet there are a lot of textural things going on in the background. It ends fairly slowly with what appears to be record player static. Compared to the loud sound that preceded it, I liked the quiet ending.

Overall I’m glad to see Ecovillage getting more interested in the smaller sounds. As their stock and trade appears to be ambient music, this is a positive step. I’m excited to see that they are now part of a larger “Virtual 7” community. Here’s hoping they keep on getting better.

DJ Admiral – Mind. In. Motion 7.5

               Some context on this: he originally worked with dance music in his first CD: Imaginivity. I figure you might need to know that to figure out where he’s coming from on this set of eight. While that previous one might have been more dance-focused, this one takes a different tact. The best way I could describe what’s going on here would be all those dance acts from the early 90s who transformed into more experimental acts as the decade progressed, particularly “The Future Sound of London”. Listening to this, “The Future Sound of London” feels especially apt, as the sounds remind me of their “Lifeforms” double disc.

                The sound is quite lush. You’re probably better off if you have on nice, thick headsets for this one. A particular joy is the bass on most of these. Usually bass is where a lot of techno fails. There’s a certain knack someone needs to create an effective but not overtake the song itself. It is a careful balance, and one the DJ handles with ease. 

                Actually, for a former DJ, he ends up putting a lot of the percussion in the background. Personally, I enjoy having melody and development as opposed to wonk-ish drum programming. So that’s definitely an excellent thing, particularly on the more ambient “Aurora” or the extremely sunny “Daybreak”.  Even the ones with a more prominent beat have enough going on in the background, whether it is “Outdoors” with the ambient atmosphere he creates or my personal favorite “Connection”. “Connection” is absolutely fantastic, the development, the bass, and the sound itself. It is probably the best closer you could have for this set. 

                His DJ-ing days gave him the ability to work out pacing and other issues. With this he appears to stake out a more unique ground than mere dance or rave-ups. It brings back images of “Chill-out Room” music, and I mean that as the highest form of flattery. Stick with the album and give it more than one listen, as there’s enough going on to miss it the first time around.