Adam Humphreys: Now on Wikipedia!



                Adam Humphreys has made it. Wikipedia is the big time. Once a person ends up on Wikipedia there’s no limit of fame and popularity to be showered upon them. Yes millions of people spend their whole lives working endlessly trying to get themselves a piece of that sweet, scrumptious Wikipedia pie. Mr. Humphreys has tasted the forbidden fruits of online microfame and found them good. 

                From lowly origins as a guy who planted trees in the Canadian bumblefuck Adam Humphreys has made quite a name for himself making a name for others. His two movies ‘Franz Otto Ultimate Highballer’ and ‘Shitty Youth’ have captivated youths across the world, from New Zealand to the United States. His films celebrate the oddball, the weird, those that fail to fit into a comfortable niche is what is commonly referred to as ‘civilization’. Indeed it is highly rumored that for his excellent work on the strange film ‘Shitty Youth’ Adam Humphreys is in the running for a highly sought-out ‘Beachie’ award for ‘Best Depiction of a Zachary German’. 

                How will Adam Humphreys use this newly discovered fame? Thanks to the Wikipedia page he some serious stuff to put on his resume besides ‘plants mad trees’ and ‘started a business out of a van’. Both of those, while highly sought after in respectable professions, lack the sort of clout a Wikipedia page brings. In fact, if Mr. Humphreys was not already married, he could easily use his Wikipedia page as a ‘getting laid’ device. Countless Wikipedia-famous citizens have used their pages in the past to obtain meaningful sexual favors. People are always looking for new pickup lines anyway. What better pickup line than ‘Hey baby how would you like to check out my Wikipedia page?’ could there possibly be?

                This page shows Mr. Humphreys as a successful entrepreneur and filmmaker. It leaves out some of his greatest accomplishments such as his astronomically high twitter following or his ability to make shorter blurbier things for such accomplished writers as Erik Stinson, bitchass motherfucker extraordinaire and some other people who aren’t bitchass motherfuckers. Honestly it brings a tear or several tears to the eye. In rare cases it is has brought people to cry uncontrollably uncertain as to why they haven’t been put on the Wikipedia map yet. Currently several literary movements have tried to make their way onto the esteemed Wikipedia website with limited success. 

                Seeing Adam Humphreys should gave all people hope: that if one puts out a good product consistently and over a prolonged period of time they too can end up on one of the web’s most respected websites.

Adam Humphreys: Now on Wikipedia!

                Adam Humphreys has made it. Wikipedia is the big time. Once a person ends up on Wikipedia there’s no limit of fame and popularity to be showered upon them. Yes millions of people spend their whole lives working endlessly trying to get themselves a piece of that sweet, scrumptious Wikipedia pie. Mr. Humphreys has tasted the forbidden fruits of online microfame and found them good. 

                From lowly origins as a guy who planted trees in the Canadian bumblefuck Adam Humphreys has made quite a name for himself making a name for others. His two movies ‘Franz Otto Ultimate Highballer’ and ‘Shitty Youth’ have captivated youths across the world, from New Zealand to the United States. His films celebrate the oddball, the weird, those that fail to fit into a comfortable niche is what is commonly referred to as ‘civilization’. Indeed it is highly rumored that for his excellent work on the strange film ‘Shitty Youth’ Adam Humphreys is in the running for a highly sought-out ‘Beachie’ award for ‘Best Depiction of a Zachary German’. 

                How will Adam Humphreys use this newly discovered fame? Thanks to the Wikipedia page he some serious stuff to put on his resume besides ‘plants mad trees’ and ‘started a business out of a van’. Both of those, while highly sought after in respectable professions, lack the sort of clout a Wikipedia page brings. In fact, if Mr. Humphreys was not already married, he could easily use his Wikipedia page as a ‘getting laid’ device. Countless Wikipedia-famous citizens have used their pages in the past to obtain meaningful sexual favors. People are always looking for new pickup lines anyway. What better pickup line than ‘Hey baby how would you like to check out my Wikipedia page?’ could there possibly be?

                This page shows Mr. Humphreys as a successful entrepreneur and filmmaker. It leaves out some of his greatest accomplishments such as his astronomically high twitter following or his ability to make shorter blurbier things for such accomplished writers as Erik Stinson, bitchass motherfucker extraordinaire and some other people who aren’t bitchass motherfuckers. Honestly it brings a tear or several tears to the eye. In rare cases it is has brought people to cry uncontrollably uncertain as to why they haven’t been put on the Wikipedia map yet. Currently several literary movements have tried to make their way onto the esteemed Wikipedia website with limited success. 

                Seeing Adam Humphreys should gave all people hope: that if one puts out a good product consistently and over a prolonged period of time they too can end up on one of the web’s most respected websites.

Franz Otto Ultimate Highballer by Adam Humphreys
               Franz Otto explores the Zen of Tree-Planting. British Columbia is Franz’s headquarters. Over the course of the film great pains are taken to show the overwhelming myth that surrounds this figure. People elaborate on why he’s special. The few who have worked with him describe him as a greater than life figure. Legends surround the person. Within this bizarre mix of eccentrics, environmentalists, and simple rugged individualists runs a common theme. One should try to be the best at whatever one chooses. 
                Here the people are outside, far away from what may be considered a ‘normal’ profession. Interviewing current high ballers shows a disdain for the boring office routine. Among the few office workers who were drawn to it is a uniform respect for what is being done. Several, tempted by academia, returns back to complete their mission of planting trees in the wilderness. More than a few of the planters express the notion that it doesn’t matter the level of educational attainment but that there is a certain draw to what is being done out there. 
                Some of the most moving moments are with Franz Otto. The first glimpse we get is of him instructing Adam to look at that bridge. Despite the work ethic of Franz he appreciates the beauty of nature around him. Environmentalism plays a small role. Watching Franz work in near silence for about two minutes is the highlight of the movie. Here Franz almost belongs to another time, to where people lived out in the countryside content with what the land provides. Other planters show a similar respect for the land. One who finds seeds underneath fallen tree stumps apologizes for stealing from squirrels. As he goes on to talk about if there is something to do it is worth doing well Adam shifts focus. The camera captures the rage and disappointment a young squirrel feels at seeing his hidden seeds being taken away. While the seeds are plunked into a bucket the squirrel screams but remains completely powerless. 
                Adam creates a beautiful picture of rural life, of being one with nature. Guy lives out in the woods with his dogs. Planters intend on working only a certain part of the years with the rest in India. They all want to experience the fullness of life. Somehow they feel almost singularly alone in the wilderness doing this out of the kindness of their hearts and sheer physical strength.
                Strangely shot, with raw footage (multiple times with bugs on the camera) it is a peaceful film. Adam keeps things mellow. Yet the message is clear: to do the best at the thing which brings you the most happiness. Over and over again the interviewees mention how this brings them the greatest joy. Money is unimportant, fame is unimportant, and they live unassuming lives up in the country. In a way they are rebuilding the frontier and watching after it, planting and re-planting as needed. These are the guardians of a nature that we constantly further and further away from. It is good that these sorts of people still exist, watching over a world that takes care of us though we’ll never meet it.

Franz Otto Ultimate Highballer by Adam Humphreys

               Franz Otto explores the Zen of Tree-Planting. British Columbia is Franz’s headquarters. Over the course of the film great pains are taken to show the overwhelming myth that surrounds this figure. People elaborate on why he’s special. The few who have worked with him describe him as a greater than life figure. Legends surround the person. Within this bizarre mix of eccentrics, environmentalists, and simple rugged individualists runs a common theme. One should try to be the best at whatever one chooses. 

                Here the people are outside, far away from what may be considered a ‘normal’ profession. Interviewing current high ballers shows a disdain for the boring office routine. Among the few office workers who were drawn to it is a uniform respect for what is being done. Several, tempted by academia, returns back to complete their mission of planting trees in the wilderness. More than a few of the planters express the notion that it doesn’t matter the level of educational attainment but that there is a certain draw to what is being done out there. 

                Some of the most moving moments are with Franz Otto. The first glimpse we get is of him instructing Adam to look at that bridge. Despite the work ethic of Franz he appreciates the beauty of nature around him. Environmentalism plays a small role. Watching Franz work in near silence for about two minutes is the highlight of the movie. Here Franz almost belongs to another time, to where people lived out in the countryside content with what the land provides. Other planters show a similar respect for the land. One who finds seeds underneath fallen tree stumps apologizes for stealing from squirrels. As he goes on to talk about if there is something to do it is worth doing well Adam shifts focus. The camera captures the rage and disappointment a young squirrel feels at seeing his hidden seeds being taken away. While the seeds are plunked into a bucket the squirrel screams but remains completely powerless. 

                Adam creates a beautiful picture of rural life, of being one with nature. Guy lives out in the woods with his dogs. Planters intend on working only a certain part of the years with the rest in India. They all want to experience the fullness of life. Somehow they feel almost singularly alone in the wilderness doing this out of the kindness of their hearts and sheer physical strength.

                Strangely shot, with raw footage (multiple times with bugs on the camera) it is a peaceful film. Adam keeps things mellow. Yet the message is clear: to do the best at the thing which brings you the most happiness. Over and over again the interviewees mention how this brings them the greatest joy. Money is unimportant, fame is unimportant, and they live unassuming lives up in the country. In a way they are rebuilding the frontier and watching after it, planting and re-planting as needed. These are the guardians of a nature that we constantly further and further away from. It is good that these sorts of people still exist, watching over a world that takes care of us though we’ll never meet it.