habitualglory
habitualglory:

This is my new zine, “1,000 Fruits”, it is very simple. Download it here, or click on the image.  

                Christian Filardo sees the small picture. Life is a series of small pictures. Without a collage life wouldn’t even make any sense. That’s why there are photo ‘albums’ rather than one photo to represent everything. No photo wants that kind of pressure. With this collection Christian manages to show what happens in tiny interactions. Some of these interactions require intense scrutiny. Other pieces show how pointless so many things can be. Either way it is okay. Pointlessness serves a higher purpose, one of mood rather than of meaning. 

                Shoes travel. Christian watches the shoes rotate at the mall. By making the shoes rotate the store hopes to make them look cooler. Like if objects are simply stationary not going anywhere it reminds people of their own stasis. Obviously the shop keeps of the world can’t let that happen. They have things to sell to young affluent people. Whoever is simultaneously young and affluent is missing out on the greatest part of youth: figuring out how to survive on the absolute bare minimum. 

                Walls offer secrets. They protect them too. Christian witnesses a person staring at a wall very intensely. Figuring that there is a deep secret of the wall he saunters right over with a swagger in his step. Nobody stops Christian from what he sees on the wall, nobody tells him what to expect on that wall, that mysterious thing. Christian sees nothing. Poor Christian fails to appreciate the motivating factor of infinite boredom. 

                Pencils need sharpening. Using the latest in pencil sharpening technology Christian has a pencil ready to use for his dreams. Dreams are made to be erased. The process is well known. Erasing dreams is better known as ‘growing up’. With each year comes a new erasure, new edits until the final product looks nothing like the beginning. Some can’t handle the editing of dreams. Honestly though dreams have to be downsized. Offices offer easy access to office supplies for a reason. 

                Fruits scream out for Christian. He fails to eat them. Probably Christian is busy eating pizza bagels. The problem with pizza bagels is that when pizza is on a bagel one can have pizza anytime. Without a time restriction every time is pizza time. New York City suffered through this before the pizza bagel era yet grew stronger as a result. Christian watches his fruit in a crate rot because those nasty little fruits do nothing for him. He wants fruit that can put in an honest day’s work.

                Christian’s little drawings add something special to this delightful delectable treat.

habitualglory:

This is my new zine, “1,000 Fruits”, it is very simple. Download it here, or click on the image.  

                Christian Filardo sees the small picture. Life is a series of small pictures. Without a collage life wouldn’t even make any sense. That’s why there are photo ‘albums’ rather than one photo to represent everything. No photo wants that kind of pressure. With this collection Christian manages to show what happens in tiny interactions. Some of these interactions require intense scrutiny. Other pieces show how pointless so many things can be. Either way it is okay. Pointlessness serves a higher purpose, one of mood rather than of meaning. 

                Shoes travel. Christian watches the shoes rotate at the mall. By making the shoes rotate the store hopes to make them look cooler. Like if objects are simply stationary not going anywhere it reminds people of their own stasis. Obviously the shop keeps of the world can’t let that happen. They have things to sell to young affluent people. Whoever is simultaneously young and affluent is missing out on the greatest part of youth: figuring out how to survive on the absolute bare minimum. 

                Walls offer secrets. They protect them too. Christian witnesses a person staring at a wall very intensely. Figuring that there is a deep secret of the wall he saunters right over with a swagger in his step. Nobody stops Christian from what he sees on the wall, nobody tells him what to expect on that wall, that mysterious thing. Christian sees nothing. Poor Christian fails to appreciate the motivating factor of infinite boredom. 

                Pencils need sharpening. Using the latest in pencil sharpening technology Christian has a pencil ready to use for his dreams. Dreams are made to be erased. The process is well known. Erasing dreams is better known as ‘growing up’. With each year comes a new erasure, new edits until the final product looks nothing like the beginning. Some can’t handle the editing of dreams. Honestly though dreams have to be downsized. Offices offer easy access to office supplies for a reason. 

                Fruits scream out for Christian. He fails to eat them. Probably Christian is busy eating pizza bagels. The problem with pizza bagels is that when pizza is on a bagel one can have pizza anytime. Without a time restriction every time is pizza time. New York City suffered through this before the pizza bagel era yet grew stronger as a result. Christian watches his fruit in a crate rot because those nasty little fruits do nothing for him. He wants fruit that can put in an honest day’s work.

                Christian’s little drawings add something special to this delightful delectable treat.

Holy Page Compilation 2011

                Christian Filardo has a lot of passion for music. Holy Page Records, his net label, shows this off. Since it first started early this year, it has released records at a breakneck pace. Even my devotion to music consumption pales in comparison to this great Arizonian. Until now you could only get these albums online. Well, things are about to change. 

                On July 1st Holy Records will offer their first physical release. The net label now is a real label. Besides being a fan of the digital format, Christian appears to be fond of the cassette culture. He’s mastered 50 tapes, complete with artwork done by hand. So all those collages you’ve seen him do can be physically felt, adored, cherished, and loved.

                You don’t need to wonder about the music sounds like: all the tracks are free for download here. The quality is what you’d expect from Holy Page Records: endearing, lo-fi, and memorable. Some of these are new artists; others are ones which should be familiar to those who have followed Holy Page since its inception many weeks ago. As I typed that, I realized this label isn’t even a year old yet has provided me with some favorites of mine already, “arcsin(100)” and “Phoenix Sons” in particular, though I’m sure there will be more. 

                The compilation idea is genius. Christian has introduced a large amount of bands via his label already. A casual observer might have difficulty in keeping up with the volume of releases. 25 tracks is a rather large compilation but music should be large in general. Some of these artists haven’t been featured on Holy Page before. This is their first time. With some of the new artists I hope it isn’t the last time we’ll be seeing them. Keeping true to a ‘pop ideal’ none of the tracks goes much beyond five minutes, with most in the two to three minute range.   

 

                Each cassette costs $6 USD. For that you get a physical copy, evidence that Holy Page Records exists. I like this idea. After watching Christian constantly uploading new stuff, I’m glad to see him up to the next stage in his passion project: creation of a new, physical product. Considering the amount of time he’s spent on it he’s definitely earned it.

                Why am I interested in this project? Besides the obvious answer “I like music” part of me feels Christian is a kindred spirit. Both of us offer a great product to the internet free of charge. Every day we return to our computers to offer something great to the mighty lord of the internet. He’s released this compilation cassette; I released an e-book. Together we try to bring music to more and more new ears, though his approaches involves actually making music, mine’s more of a ‘Public Service Announcement’ (PSA) deal. 

                Pre-order from him and you get a free digital zine (for those of you too young, a zine was like a blogspot but in print) and an original drawing from him. Did I mention he draws as well? Christian Fildaro works harder than me I guess but then I’m a sloth. 

                I’m excited. You should be too. Listen here. Enjoy!

I’ve Been Franklin – Settling the Score 7.6

  I’ve Been Franklin is the first release of the “Holy Page” online record label. The basic premise of the Holy Page is artists release their music for free (download here),  and the record label head Christian Filardo does the artwork.  Considering the “Creature Comforts” kind of cut-up Christian did for the  artwork, I don’t think it’s a terribly bad idea.

                Gregory  Campanile has worked in many bands, but this project is the first I’ve  heard of him. Besides working in Reindeer Tiger Team, Total Noise,  Bikeula, Dragon Zone, Levines!, Unkill Frankenstein, etc. Basic gist is  he’s a busy man in Arizona. Here is his first solo outing, originally  released in 2009, recorded from 2008 to 2009. Listening to it, I’m  reminded of other quirky solo arrangers like Nathan Michel, who relied  on unusual arrangements for maximum emotional effect. Even his vocals on  “Foreign Frog” sounds like something you’d find on Nathan Michel’s “The  Beast”.

                Though  it is only 22 minutes, it feels fully formed. According to the very few  notes I have on this, he wrote this in a few different locations using  only Garageband. Most of these songs are below the two minute mark, but  listening to it, those lengths are long enough. Somehow he’s able to  convey all he wants to touch upon in just that sort span of time. He has  a fragmented sense of pop, with melodies and enough quirks to keep you  interested. 

                “Settling  In” offers the kind of gloopy synthesizer you’d expect beginning a High  Llamas track. He takes that and slowly builds into a zoned-out space.  Even the ending shows off the same attention to details, with “Smoking”  ending in a blurred piano.

                Actually,  if this is the first release for the Holy Page label, they’ve obviously  set the bar pretty high. Who knows, maybe I’ve Been Franklin might be  encouraged to release more. Here’s hoping. 

I’ve Been Franklin – Settling the Score 7.6

  I’ve Been Franklin is the first release of the “Holy Page” online record label. The basic premise of the Holy Page is artists release their music for free (download here), and the record label head Christian Filardo does the artwork. Considering the “Creature Comforts” kind of cut-up Christian did for the artwork, I don’t think it’s a terribly bad idea.

                Gregory Campanile has worked in many bands, but this project is the first I’ve heard of him. Besides working in Reindeer Tiger Team, Total Noise, Bikeula, Dragon Zone, Levines!, Unkill Frankenstein, etc. Basic gist is he’s a busy man in Arizona. Here is his first solo outing, originally released in 2009, recorded from 2008 to 2009. Listening to it, I’m reminded of other quirky solo arrangers like Nathan Michel, who relied on unusual arrangements for maximum emotional effect. Even his vocals on “Foreign Frog” sounds like something you’d find on Nathan Michel’s “The Beast”.

                Though it is only 22 minutes, it feels fully formed. According to the very few notes I have on this, he wrote this in a few different locations using only Garageband. Most of these songs are below the two minute mark, but listening to it, those lengths are long enough. Somehow he’s able to convey all he wants to touch upon in just that sort span of time. He has a fragmented sense of pop, with melodies and enough quirks to keep you interested. 

                “Settling In” offers the kind of gloopy synthesizer you’d expect beginning a High Llamas track. He takes that and slowly builds into a zoned-out space. Even the ending shows off the same attention to details, with “Smoking” ending in a blurred piano.

                Actually, if this is the first release for the Holy Page label, they’ve obviously set the bar pretty high. Who knows, maybe I’ve Been Franklin might be encouraged to release more. Here’s hoping. 

Today I was fortunate enough to sit down  (metaphorically) with the mastermind behind the Dunkwave project “Vladee  Divacc”, Christian Filardo . Actually, they are the only Dunkwave  artists so far, since they created the term. Clearly they are the most  famous dunkwave artists right now. Below are some of the questions I  asked them about their music. If you want me to send you random  questions with varying degrees of personal interest and count it as an  interview, feel free to email me at [Beachsloths@gmail.com]. I’ll put  something together.1.       What inspired you to name this project after Vlade Divac?Being  a child of the 90’s and opening up pack after pack of cards, i had a  ton of Divacs, tons, plus he is a deft passer and flopper. Also he is  largely mediocre, but had his bright spots and team players are awesome!2.       More  importantly, why and when did you decide to coin the term “Dunkwave”  and what makes a song quality as “Dunkwave” (in case others want to  follow in your footsteps).I  decided to make Dunkwave or coin it Dunkwave because that was the whole  starting point. Not getting picked for the team, dads’ telling their  kids to hustle, giants, fouling, and huge civil rights movements:  basketball has it all. There is a lot of art in SPORT and I wanted that  to be realized. Who are the average players? Why are they even in the  NBA? Should they be allowed to hold public office? The only limit to a  “Dunkwave” song is that it has to be about basketball or constructed by  basketball, if it isn’t it isn’t Dunkwave. Just titling your song  doesn’t count.3.       On  your Tumblr, you mention that you’d like to tour in 2011. Are there any  particular areas you’d like to perform in and who do you think would be  the most receptive of your music?West  Coast, we are super super super broke! Anyone who is into noise, or in  the cold, we would be really into the Pacific Northwest possibly Canada.  We do better in the cold. We want to play a halftime show, or in the  Rose Garden, or maybe somewhere with a lot of mascots. 4.       Does  Tempe, Arizona offer enough support for a musical underground, and are  either one of you involved in any other projects you’d like to share  with us?Tempe  offers lots of support as does Phoenix, I am the main writer and  producer for Vladee Divacc, and eddy has a glitch solo project called  “Girlhood”. Up to this point I have been writing and recording  everything for Divacc, however Eddy is super involved live and is  helping me on Get Open.5.       Who would you cite as influences for your music?John Cage, Christian Marclay, Peaking Lights, Ponytail, Erik Satie6.        Are there any particular albums you’ve been enjoying lately?Weed- DC Hope EP and the Townhouses Mono No Aware EP7.       Was there any particular moment of “A-ha” that made you choose this artistic path?Well  the idea of sport as art really fascinates me; you don’t see regular  guys on the street that are 7 foot + that often. To get lots of these  guys on a court, make them play a game, and then make them icons, wear  their names on our backs its nuts.8.       Have you ever seen the movie “Space Jam”? Did that movie have any influence over your sound?Yes,  I have seen Space Jam and no it had zero influence over our sound, the  soundtrack is pretty sub-par. However, Vlade Divac is in a scene in it  briefly outside the Lakers locker room!9.       If you could score a movie, which movie would it be and why?Anything for Lynch, we just agree. 10.   What are your plans after college? Will you continue to create and produce music?Well,  I would like to move to Detroit and use my artistic efforts to help  rebuild that city, if music is what I want to do I will. It’s for fun,  and if it stops being fun then I will stop. 11.   Let’s say reincarnation exists. Given a choice, what or who would you like to be re-incarnated as? John Cage12.   Do  you think that there will be other sports looking to create their own  musical genres? Will “Boccewave” become a musical genre, mixing the  sounds of Old Italian men playing Bocce with J-Pop?No, most sports fans just want to live for the game, not for the sounds. I want to live for both.

Today I was fortunate enough to sit down (metaphorically) with the mastermind behind the Dunkwave project “Vladee Divacc”, Christian Filardo . Actually, they are the only Dunkwave artists so far, since they created the term. Clearly they are the most famous dunkwave artists right now. Below are some of the questions I asked them about their music. If you want me to send you random questions with varying degrees of personal interest and count it as an interview, feel free to email me at [Beachsloths@gmail.com]. I’ll put something together.
1.       What inspired you to name this project after Vlade Divac?
Being a child of the 90’s and opening up pack after pack of cards, i had a ton of Divacs, tons, plus he is a deft passer and flopper. Also he is largely mediocre, but had his bright spots and team players are awesome!
2.       More importantly, why and when did you decide to coin the term “Dunkwave” and what makes a song quality as “Dunkwave” (in case others want to follow in your footsteps).
I decided to make Dunkwave or coin it Dunkwave because that was the whole starting point. Not getting picked for the team, dads’ telling their kids to hustle, giants, fouling, and huge civil rights movements: basketball has it all. There is a lot of art in SPORT and I wanted that to be realized. Who are the average players? Why are they even in the NBA? Should they be allowed to hold public office? The only limit to a “Dunkwave” song is that it has to be about basketball or constructed by basketball, if it isn’t it isn’t Dunkwave. Just titling your song doesn’t count.
3.       On your Tumblr, you mention that you’d like to tour in 2011. Are there any particular areas you’d like to perform in and who do you think would be the most receptive of your music?
West Coast, we are super super super broke! Anyone who is into noise, or in the cold, we would be really into the Pacific Northwest possibly Canada. We do better in the cold. We want to play a halftime show, or in the Rose Garden, or maybe somewhere with a lot of mascots. 
4.       Does Tempe, Arizona offer enough support for a musical underground, and are either one of you involved in any other projects you’d like to share with us?Tempe offers lots of support as does Phoenix, I am the main writer and producer for Vladee Divacc, and eddy has a glitch solo project called “Girlhood”. Up to this point I have been writing and recording everything for Divacc, however Eddy is super involved live and is helping me on Get Open.
5.       Who would you cite as influences for your music?John Cage, Christian Marclay, Peaking Lights, Ponytail, Erik Satie
6.        Are there any particular albums you’ve been enjoying lately?Weed- DC Hope EP and the Townhouses Mono No Aware EP
7.       Was there any particular moment of “A-ha” that made you choose this artistic path?Well the idea of sport as art really fascinates me; you don’t see regular guys on the street that are 7 foot + that often. To get lots of these guys on a court, make them play a game, and then make them icons, wear their names on our backs its nuts.
8.       Have you ever seen the movie “Space Jam”? Did that movie have any influence over your sound?Yes, I have seen Space Jam and no it had zero influence over our sound, the soundtrack is pretty sub-par. However, Vlade Divac is in a scene in it briefly outside the Lakers locker room!
9.       If you could score a movie, which movie would it be and why?Anything for Lynch, we just agree. 
10.   What are your plans after college? Will you continue to create and produce music?Well, I would like to move to Detroit and use my artistic efforts to help rebuild that city, if music is what I want to do I will. It’s for fun, and if it stops being fun then I will stop. 
11.   Let’s say reincarnation exists. Given a choice, what or who would you like to be re-incarnated as? John Cage
12.   Do you think that there will be other sports looking to create their own musical genres? Will “Boccewave” become a musical genre, mixing the sounds of Old Italian men playing Bocce with J-Pop?No, most sports fans just want to live for the game, not for the sounds. I want to live for both.

Vladee Divacc – Technical Foul EP 7.4

Maybe the kids in Tempe, Arizona need something to do. Leave it to the blandest suburbs imaginable that would make people create “Dunkwave”. Apparently Dunkwave is a mixture of noise, drone, and random basketball samples. Before you groan and say “Geez, that sounds like literally the most awful thing ever” give it a listen. I decided to pretend I hadn’t just read what it actually was and put it on.


Vladee Divacc (a reference to the Serbian basketball player Vlade Divac) consists of Edouard Urcadez and Christian Filardo, two young artists from Arizona State University. Together they’ve made an oddly compelling noise/drone act. Plus, they get rid of the usual boring acts by playing in actual basketball courts (though they get kicked out, which is unfortunate).
Right from the get go, you feel the bouncing ball, though it is disguised through various levels of distortion. “Ostertag” has this is in full as you hear the healthy levels of distortion. The word “Ostertag” swims through the delightful muck. 
The vocals grab you though. Sounding like early Pocahaunted vocals, they are sustained for unreasonable periods of time. Mixed with the lower registers, it occasionally transforms into some beautiful moments, like dead in the center of “Drazen Petrovic (Hero)” where they seem to reach a gentle, fleeting moment. “Technical” is just basically vocals for the majority of the song and is shockingly well-done. 
Despite what many might see as a pointless gimmick, it does succeed in what it sets up to do. Basketball suddenly becomes a part of this hyper-weird environment. The gimmick actually helps give it a personality, avoiding the fate of being faceless artists making noise drone music. And at only 12 minutes, it doesn’t overstay its welcome.