Adam Humphreys: Now on Wikipedia!



                Adam Humphreys has made it. Wikipedia is the big time. Once a person ends up on Wikipedia there’s no limit of fame and popularity to be showered upon them. Yes millions of people spend their whole lives working endlessly trying to get themselves a piece of that sweet, scrumptious Wikipedia pie. Mr. Humphreys has tasted the forbidden fruits of online microfame and found them good. 

                From lowly origins as a guy who planted trees in the Canadian bumblefuck Adam Humphreys has made quite a name for himself making a name for others. His two movies ‘Franz Otto Ultimate Highballer’ and ‘Shitty Youth’ have captivated youths across the world, from New Zealand to the United States. His films celebrate the oddball, the weird, those that fail to fit into a comfortable niche is what is commonly referred to as ‘civilization’. Indeed it is highly rumored that for his excellent work on the strange film ‘Shitty Youth’ Adam Humphreys is in the running for a highly sought-out ‘Beachie’ award for ‘Best Depiction of a Zachary German’. 

                How will Adam Humphreys use this newly discovered fame? Thanks to the Wikipedia page he some serious stuff to put on his resume besides ‘plants mad trees’ and ‘started a business out of a van’. Both of those, while highly sought after in respectable professions, lack the sort of clout a Wikipedia page brings. In fact, if Mr. Humphreys was not already married, he could easily use his Wikipedia page as a ‘getting laid’ device. Countless Wikipedia-famous citizens have used their pages in the past to obtain meaningful sexual favors. People are always looking for new pickup lines anyway. What better pickup line than ‘Hey baby how would you like to check out my Wikipedia page?’ could there possibly be?

                This page shows Mr. Humphreys as a successful entrepreneur and filmmaker. It leaves out some of his greatest accomplishments such as his astronomically high twitter following or his ability to make shorter blurbier things for such accomplished writers as Erik Stinson, bitchass motherfucker extraordinaire and some other people who aren’t bitchass motherfuckers. Honestly it brings a tear or several tears to the eye. In rare cases it is has brought people to cry uncontrollably uncertain as to why they haven’t been put on the Wikipedia map yet. Currently several literary movements have tried to make their way onto the esteemed Wikipedia website with limited success. 

                Seeing Adam Humphreys should gave all people hope: that if one puts out a good product consistently and over a prolonged period of time they too can end up on one of the web’s most respected websites.

Adam Humphreys: Now on Wikipedia!

                Adam Humphreys has made it. Wikipedia is the big time. Once a person ends up on Wikipedia there’s no limit of fame and popularity to be showered upon them. Yes millions of people spend their whole lives working endlessly trying to get themselves a piece of that sweet, scrumptious Wikipedia pie. Mr. Humphreys has tasted the forbidden fruits of online microfame and found them good. 

                From lowly origins as a guy who planted trees in the Canadian bumblefuck Adam Humphreys has made quite a name for himself making a name for others. His two movies ‘Franz Otto Ultimate Highballer’ and ‘Shitty Youth’ have captivated youths across the world, from New Zealand to the United States. His films celebrate the oddball, the weird, those that fail to fit into a comfortable niche is what is commonly referred to as ‘civilization’. Indeed it is highly rumored that for his excellent work on the strange film ‘Shitty Youth’ Adam Humphreys is in the running for a highly sought-out ‘Beachie’ award for ‘Best Depiction of a Zachary German’. 

                How will Adam Humphreys use this newly discovered fame? Thanks to the Wikipedia page he some serious stuff to put on his resume besides ‘plants mad trees’ and ‘started a business out of a van’. Both of those, while highly sought after in respectable professions, lack the sort of clout a Wikipedia page brings. In fact, if Mr. Humphreys was not already married, he could easily use his Wikipedia page as a ‘getting laid’ device. Countless Wikipedia-famous citizens have used their pages in the past to obtain meaningful sexual favors. People are always looking for new pickup lines anyway. What better pickup line than ‘Hey baby how would you like to check out my Wikipedia page?’ could there possibly be?

                This page shows Mr. Humphreys as a successful entrepreneur and filmmaker. It leaves out some of his greatest accomplishments such as his astronomically high twitter following or his ability to make shorter blurbier things for such accomplished writers as Erik Stinson, bitchass motherfucker extraordinaire and some other people who aren’t bitchass motherfuckers. Honestly it brings a tear or several tears to the eye. In rare cases it is has brought people to cry uncontrollably uncertain as to why they haven’t been put on the Wikipedia map yet. Currently several literary movements have tried to make their way onto the esteemed Wikipedia website with limited success. 

                Seeing Adam Humphreys should gave all people hope: that if one puts out a good product consistently and over a prolonged period of time they too can end up on one of the web’s most respected websites.

chateaumarmontstationary

hatecrime:

“I see writing on the internet not as forgoing any sort of conventional literary career… it’s more like… avoiding the traditional first steps.” - Erik Stinson

1. Click the video

2. Click the $ sign to play or pause the video

previous trailers I’ve directed for Erik: 2010, Mar. 2012

                Erik Stinson is a bitch-ass motherfucker doing bitch-ass motherfucker type things. He seems nice. Behind his sunglasses rests the soul of a bitch-ass motherfucker also known as a ‘Brooklyn resident’. He’s in some cute looking little hovel of a room. A money sign introduces him playing with the perception of what is means to be a ‘player’. Does this indicate that indeed Erik Stinson is a player of the highest online writer caliber? Judging by the fact that he lives somewhere, appears vaguely well-groomed, and has a calm voice the answer might be ‘yes’. Adam Humphreys, that mischievous scamp, currently seems to think so. Indeed the trailer shows Erik off in a sympathetic light. 

                The beginning introduces Erik Stinson as someone who might be in love. Various descriptions are given of his love. Smoke comes out of his mouth. This is known as ‘love smoke’. Dragons of the middle ages suffered from the ‘love smoke’ dilemma. Obviously Erik is turned on by the sheer thought of love. He’s literally burning up inside. Only one thing can cool down his hot and bothered self: a walk through the park on a crisp autumn day. 

                Leaves shower Erik Stinson. This is the autumn equivalent of ‘making it rain’ only the trees are making it rain with their dead body parts. It is hot. Erik explains the joy of love. Here he says it can be exciting or something. Love is taking over Erik’s life. From here Erik moves onto his other, earlier love: his love of publishing stuff on the internet. 

                Internet writing is a huge part of Erik’s livelihood. Professionalism in writing annoys him. With the power of the internet he can write whatever he wants. Nobody is stopping him. Publishing on the internet is avoiding the traditional first steps. Here he mentions his writing is for young people. Young people are generally on the internet all the time. Accomplishing something is huge for the young people. Making art, having friends, this is the most important thing one can do with life. 

‘Do You Log in Here Often’ is the name of his fifth book. It is going to be his best book yet? Judging by the flames that engulf him at the end of the video the answer is yes. To judge by his slight removal of his sunglasses he’s coyly flirting with the viewer. He wants to know if anyone logs in here often. What answer someone gives will determine his fate.

Shitty Youth




                Zachary German is an anomaly. A twenty-something writer of alternative fiction with zero web presence whatsoever yet not so long ago he was all there. What happened? Shitty Youth presents the portrait of the artist who doesn’t give a fuck. German has structured his life from the creation of culture to the consumption of it. Here the documentary focuses on German going from wanting to be a part of the literary scene to wanting to be apart from the literary scene. German states ‘I don’t think that what they are doing is interesting or worthwhile so I don’t need to talk to them’ regarding the more recent phenomena of alt lit or online literature. 

                German is alone. In front of a microphone for Shitty Youth, his radio show, he is alone. Kitchens are vacant sans German and his minimal radio equipment. Out walking dogs for his job he remains alone. Whether or not there is an audience is irrelevant for German. He does what he wants how he wants. German’s criticism and thoughts on literature are amazing. If he ever wanted to do literary criticism he seems to have the analytical mind and interest. Motivation and meeting his internal standards would continue to be a problem like it has been for his fiction however. 

                Figures within the literary community discuss German. Some of them claim to be his ‘friends’. German’s ‘friends’ like David Fishkind claim to see him once every two months, hang out with him without talking to him, and are abruptly told to leave. Tao Lin states German wants no online presence and relishes the ability to tear it down. Tao Lin also talks about how Zachary may be genius level in terms of how he writes. David Fishkind describes the style German uses and the effectiveness of it. Indeed German’s art appeals to people far more than German as a person. 

                Marshall Mallicoat states ‘he’s an ubermensch, he doesn’t need anybody’. This is reflected in how German interacts with the world. Out of all the people interviewed about German the best moment comes with Brandon Scott Gorrell. Here is where the philosophy of Zachary German becomes clear. The concept of ‘Apathyiscool’ German’s old twitter handle is taken apart. And the ending result after Gorrell is done is of a life sans accompaniment akin to a modern day hermit. For German appears fine with loneliness even prefers it. Alone German does not need to validate or respond to anyone. This may explain his desire to avoid online interaction. 

German discussion on his writing it is illuminating. Here is where some of the worry of ‘Is German ever going to come out with another book’ gets addressed. Right as he says that his book sucks he stares blankly at the screen, sad for a moment, and then moves the talk to wondering where they are.  Parts of the documentary get self-aware with German stating ‘That’s so stupid to need an arc’. Out of this comes perhaps the saddest part of the film. Right as German reads in Florida to a crowd inclined to like his work he finds a typo. “Robert takes an ice cube tray out of the ice cube” – this is a typo that most would automatically correct. German doesn’t. Rather he says ‘I was so good for so long’. 

‘I was so good for so long.’ This may be the answer to everything. Why German exists as two separate people: the one that existed for his ‘Eat When You Feel Sad’ publishing phase and the post-publication work. Here German appears to show that he genuinely feels trapped and unable to do anything that meets his own self-imposed publication standards. An artist trapped is what comes out of the movie at the end. After the reading German watches dogs race. He appears disinterested in what is going on and the camera pans out, showing him standing alone in the darkness with Americana surrounding him.

Shitty Youth

                Zachary German is an anomaly. A twenty-something writer of alternative fiction with zero web presence whatsoever yet not so long ago he was all there. What happened? Shitty Youth presents the portrait of the artist who doesn’t give a fuck. German has structured his life from the creation of culture to the consumption of it. Here the documentary focuses on German going from wanting to be a part of the literary scene to wanting to be apart from the literary scene. German states ‘I don’t think that what they are doing is interesting or worthwhile so I don’t need to talk to them’ regarding the more recent phenomena of alt lit or online literature. 

                German is alone. In front of a microphone for Shitty Youth, his radio show, he is alone. Kitchens are vacant sans German and his minimal radio equipment. Out walking dogs for his job he remains alone. Whether or not there is an audience is irrelevant for German. He does what he wants how he wants. German’s criticism and thoughts on literature are amazing. If he ever wanted to do literary criticism he seems to have the analytical mind and interest. Motivation and meeting his internal standards would continue to be a problem like it has been for his fiction however. 

                Figures within the literary community discuss German. Some of them claim to be his ‘friends’. German’s ‘friends’ like David Fishkind claim to see him once every two months, hang out with him without talking to him, and are abruptly told to leave. Tao Lin states German wants no online presence and relishes the ability to tear it down. Tao Lin also talks about how Zachary may be genius level in terms of how he writes. David Fishkind describes the style German uses and the effectiveness of it. Indeed German’s art appeals to people far more than German as a person. 

                Marshall Mallicoat states ‘he’s an ubermensch, he doesn’t need anybody’. This is reflected in how German interacts with the world. Out of all the people interviewed about German the best moment comes with Brandon Scott Gorrell. Here is where the philosophy of Zachary German becomes clear. The concept of ‘Apathyiscool’ German’s old twitter handle is taken apart. And the ending result after Gorrell is done is of a life sans accompaniment akin to a modern day hermit. For German appears fine with loneliness even prefers it. Alone German does not need to validate or respond to anyone. This may explain his desire to avoid online interaction. 

German discussion on his writing it is illuminating. Here is where some of the worry of ‘Is German ever going to come out with another book’ gets addressed. Right as he says that his book sucks he stares blankly at the screen, sad for a moment, and then moves the talk to wondering where they are.  Parts of the documentary get self-aware with German stating ‘That’s so stupid to need an arc’. Out of this comes perhaps the saddest part of the film. Right as German reads in Florida to a crowd inclined to like his work he finds a typo. “Robert takes an ice cube tray out of the ice cube” – this is a typo that most would automatically correct. German doesn’t. Rather he says ‘I was so good for so long’. 

‘I was so good for so long.’ This may be the answer to everything. Why German exists as two separate people: the one that existed for his ‘Eat When You Feel Sad’ publishing phase and the post-publication work. Here German appears to show that he genuinely feels trapped and unable to do anything that meets his own self-imposed publication standards. An artist trapped is what comes out of the movie at the end. After the reading German watches dogs race. He appears disinterested in what is going on and the camera pans out, showing him standing alone in the darkness with Americana surrounding him.

Franz Otto Ultimate Highballer by Adam Humphreys
               Franz Otto explores the Zen of Tree-Planting. British Columbia is Franz’s headquarters. Over the course of the film great pains are taken to show the overwhelming myth that surrounds this figure. People elaborate on why he’s special. The few who have worked with him describe him as a greater than life figure. Legends surround the person. Within this bizarre mix of eccentrics, environmentalists, and simple rugged individualists runs a common theme. One should try to be the best at whatever one chooses. 
                Here the people are outside, far away from what may be considered a ‘normal’ profession. Interviewing current high ballers shows a disdain for the boring office routine. Among the few office workers who were drawn to it is a uniform respect for what is being done. Several, tempted by academia, returns back to complete their mission of planting trees in the wilderness. More than a few of the planters express the notion that it doesn’t matter the level of educational attainment but that there is a certain draw to what is being done out there. 
                Some of the most moving moments are with Franz Otto. The first glimpse we get is of him instructing Adam to look at that bridge. Despite the work ethic of Franz he appreciates the beauty of nature around him. Environmentalism plays a small role. Watching Franz work in near silence for about two minutes is the highlight of the movie. Here Franz almost belongs to another time, to where people lived out in the countryside content with what the land provides. Other planters show a similar respect for the land. One who finds seeds underneath fallen tree stumps apologizes for stealing from squirrels. As he goes on to talk about if there is something to do it is worth doing well Adam shifts focus. The camera captures the rage and disappointment a young squirrel feels at seeing his hidden seeds being taken away. While the seeds are plunked into a bucket the squirrel screams but remains completely powerless. 
                Adam creates a beautiful picture of rural life, of being one with nature. Guy lives out in the woods with his dogs. Planters intend on working only a certain part of the years with the rest in India. They all want to experience the fullness of life. Somehow they feel almost singularly alone in the wilderness doing this out of the kindness of their hearts and sheer physical strength.
                Strangely shot, with raw footage (multiple times with bugs on the camera) it is a peaceful film. Adam keeps things mellow. Yet the message is clear: to do the best at the thing which brings you the most happiness. Over and over again the interviewees mention how this brings them the greatest joy. Money is unimportant, fame is unimportant, and they live unassuming lives up in the country. In a way they are rebuilding the frontier and watching after it, planting and re-planting as needed. These are the guardians of a nature that we constantly further and further away from. It is good that these sorts of people still exist, watching over a world that takes care of us though we’ll never meet it.

Franz Otto Ultimate Highballer by Adam Humphreys

               Franz Otto explores the Zen of Tree-Planting. British Columbia is Franz’s headquarters. Over the course of the film great pains are taken to show the overwhelming myth that surrounds this figure. People elaborate on why he’s special. The few who have worked with him describe him as a greater than life figure. Legends surround the person. Within this bizarre mix of eccentrics, environmentalists, and simple rugged individualists runs a common theme. One should try to be the best at whatever one chooses. 

                Here the people are outside, far away from what may be considered a ‘normal’ profession. Interviewing current high ballers shows a disdain for the boring office routine. Among the few office workers who were drawn to it is a uniform respect for what is being done. Several, tempted by academia, returns back to complete their mission of planting trees in the wilderness. More than a few of the planters express the notion that it doesn’t matter the level of educational attainment but that there is a certain draw to what is being done out there. 

                Some of the most moving moments are with Franz Otto. The first glimpse we get is of him instructing Adam to look at that bridge. Despite the work ethic of Franz he appreciates the beauty of nature around him. Environmentalism plays a small role. Watching Franz work in near silence for about two minutes is the highlight of the movie. Here Franz almost belongs to another time, to where people lived out in the countryside content with what the land provides. Other planters show a similar respect for the land. One who finds seeds underneath fallen tree stumps apologizes for stealing from squirrels. As he goes on to talk about if there is something to do it is worth doing well Adam shifts focus. The camera captures the rage and disappointment a young squirrel feels at seeing his hidden seeds being taken away. While the seeds are plunked into a bucket the squirrel screams but remains completely powerless. 

                Adam creates a beautiful picture of rural life, of being one with nature. Guy lives out in the woods with his dogs. Planters intend on working only a certain part of the years with the rest in India. They all want to experience the fullness of life. Somehow they feel almost singularly alone in the wilderness doing this out of the kindness of their hearts and sheer physical strength.

                Strangely shot, with raw footage (multiple times with bugs on the camera) it is a peaceful film. Adam keeps things mellow. Yet the message is clear: to do the best at the thing which brings you the most happiness. Over and over again the interviewees mention how this brings them the greatest joy. Money is unimportant, fame is unimportant, and they live unassuming lives up in the country. In a way they are rebuilding the frontier and watching after it, planting and re-planting as needed. These are the guardians of a nature that we constantly further and further away from. It is good that these sorts of people still exist, watching over a world that takes care of us though we’ll never meet it.