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#SNCKCREW, A POSITIVE MOVEMENT [NEW VIDEO]

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SPREAD POSITIVITY

                New eras of positivity need to happen. There’s a lot of sadness in the world, downright badness in some cases. Everybody can sad. That’s okay. Occasionally there will be the bad that makes feeling good that much better. It is comparisons. For every up there is a down. Sometimes though getting through that sad feeling is tough to do all alone. Hence the internet is out there. Positive vibes stems out of the internet which is better known as a place to vent frustrations. Rather than troll or abuse people online why not simply love and support them? Supporting others creates something of a feedback loop of happiness. 

                Positive messages shall be sent during this dawn of the age of snack pack. Before in the 60s people believed in the Age of Aquarius. That’s gone though. 60s vibes are over. Now there needs to be a new way, a third way. Use of the internet can make such a thing happen. Random acts of kindness can make the internet a better place. In fact the internet is heavily constructed for randomness. Why not make that randomness have a positive impact on people’s lives? Daniel Alexander believes in the power of positive internet. This is encouraging as it shows a trending away from the infinite sadness of trolling and towards the internet’s natural role of community building. 

                Little outlets exist all across the internet to spread positivity. Daniel Alexander searches Twitter to turn frowns upside down. Frowns are just upside down smiley faces. This is Social Media Science 101. There’s also the concept of online positively called ‘The Domino Theory. Originally thought up as a plan of containing communism, ‘The Domino Theory’ has been given a second life on social media sites like ‘Second Life’. The premise is simple: support for others comes back to help that person out. Essentially being nice on the internet is akin to karma: it will come back either good or bad. Either way it returns. 

                 Motivation is the seed of creation. Without it nothing can happen. Creating pieces of art can take a long time. Some pieces of art can take years to fully articulate. As one Frank Hinton stated ‘Art is subjective but effort isn’t’. Creating something beautiful can take a while. During that time it can be difficult to continue, to convince oneself that it is truly worth it. Blogging takes a lot out of people as does writing, painting, photography, etc. Thanks to Daniel Alexander’s call to positivity there is hope that this motivation can be brought and new wonderful things can be introduced to a bewildered world! This is a positive movement, this is the internet.

My Feelings about Technology

At some point, you have to figure out exactly where you stand on technology. Do you build a personal brand through constant obnoxious ploys, plastering your face all over the place? What motivates you to come onto the internet, do you have an insight or are you there to simply dispense your advice on life? Personally, I see a lot of what goes on as forms of personal curating, especially with music blogs. Old styles are swept old, new ones configured with whatever is lying around. Some nostalgia, is it 60s, 70s, or 90s vintage? Can you put a house beat to it?

My concern on this deals with how connected people really are. I’ve noticed a proliferation of phones and laptops meant to keep people in interaction at all times. Obviously this isn’t anything new; it has been a long process. But occasionally things like the “Don’t tase me bro” or Bill Nye’s sudden collapse captures my attention. How connected should we be? Is there such a thing as being too hyper-sensitive to one’s online news environment, and could it happen to me?

I wonder about this. How can one think without occasionally taking a break from everything going on? Consuming at some point requires a degree of reflection. My reflection occurs when I bike, when I travel, when I work. A large white brick serves as my phone, I’m happy I can receive text messages. I’m not sure if I’d feel comfortable diving headfirst into an IPhone or Blackberry. In some ways, I follow many online communities with a degree of dedication. But in others, I’m more than happy to get back to people on my schedule. Things can wait, things can linger. 

An alias works better for me in this format. If someone reading this saw or knew what I’d look like, then that could potentially change their opinion of what they’re writing. I understand why people do this. Plus, if people knew who wrote this, they might demand more or less from me. A suggestion or two would pop up, and I don’t know what I’d do. 

Occasionally I think this connectivity leads to hyperactivity. Though it is in some ways bad, maybe the brain re-wiring allows us to appreciate that time we spend alone. Productivity did increase upon the advent of the internet. But then as high speed internet became commonplace it faltered.

Could it be possible that there is a sweet spot of saturation? Where the amount of information you receive is enough, at that perfect point. You can take everything in while at the same time not being overwhelmed by various alerts, updates, etc. Due to these alerts I barely check my facebook, I try to avoid too much while I’m working or before I go to bed. I want to feel like a human being and not like breathing circuitry. 

 Smartphones will be lost on me for a certain period of time. I’m not sure if this makes me a late adopter, or if I prefer my space and quiet. Lately I’ve grown to appreciate that quiet as trains scream at me, as construction goes on into the bizarre hours of the night, and as I go into the bathroom I hear radio blasting from very far away. Being without distraction is a rare thing indeed, I guess I’m lucky to encounter it every so often. No phone should ever take that away from me.

My Feelings about Technology

At some point, you have to figure out exactly where you stand on technology. Do you build a personal brand through constant obnoxious ploys, plastering your face all over the place? What motivates you to come onto the internet, do you have an insight or are you there to simply dispense your advice on life? Personally, I see a lot of what goes on as forms of personal curating, especially with music blogs. Old styles are swept old, new ones configured with whatever is lying around. Some nostalgia, is it 60s, 70s, or 90s vintage? Can you put a house beat to it?

My concern on this deals with how connected people really are. I’ve noticed a proliferation of phones and laptops meant to keep people in interaction at all times. Obviously this isn’t anything new; it has been a long process. But occasionally things like the “Don’t tase me bro” or Bill Nye’s sudden collapse captures my attention. How connected should we be? Is there such a thing as being too hyper-sensitive to one’s online news environment, and could it happen to me?

I wonder about this. How can one think without occasionally taking a break from everything going on? Consuming at some point requires a degree of reflection. My reflection occurs when I bike, when I travel, when I work. A large white brick serves as my phone, I’m happy I can receive text messages. I’m not sure if I’d feel comfortable diving headfirst into an IPhone or Blackberry. In some ways, I follow many online communities with a degree of dedication. But in others, I’m more than happy to get back to people on my schedule. Things can wait, things can linger. 

An alias works better for me in this format. If someone reading this saw or knew what I’d look like, then that could potentially change their opinion of what they’re writing. I understand why people do this. Plus, if people knew who wrote this, they might demand more or less from me. A suggestion or two would pop up, and I don’t know what I’d do. 

Occasionally I think this connectivity leads to hyperactivity. Though it is in some ways bad, maybe the brain re-wiring allows us to appreciate that time we spend alone. Productivity did increase upon the advent of the internet. But then as high speed internet became commonplace it faltered.

Could it be possible that there is a sweet spot of saturation? Where the amount of information you receive is enough, at that perfect point. You can take everything in while at the same time not being overwhelmed by various alerts, updates, etc. Due to these alerts I barely check my facebook, I try to avoid too much while I’m working or before I go to bed. I want to feel like a human being and not like breathing circuitry. 

 Smartphones will be lost on me for a certain period of time. I’m not sure if this makes me a late adopter, or if I prefer my space and quiet. Lately I’ve grown to appreciate that quiet as trains scream at me, as construction goes on into the bizarre hours of the night, and as I go into the bathroom I hear radio blasting from very far away. Being without distraction is a rare thing indeed, I guess I’m lucky to encounter it every so often. No phone should ever take that away from me.

Vince Guaraldi Trio – A Charlie Brown Christmas 9.3

Man, this has to be head and shoulders above all other Christmas albums. Usually Christmas albums are some ultra-cheesy way for somebody to rip a few bucks off of their fans. The end result is terrible, but the fans that purchase it are so deluded with the artist’s power they don’t even notice. 

                Vince Guaraldi achieved the impossible feat then: to create a cool Christmas album that never ages or feels insincere. At no point do you say to yourself “this feels forced”. Rather the more you listen to it you wish that more artists could have the class and restraint that Vince shows in this absolutely warm album. 

                Both the originals and renditions are beautiful. Each particular emotional chord is pressed. Actually it probably embodies a lot of what Christmas really is: despite the decorative lighting and get-together s, it is a somber holiday. The excitement tends to dissipate fairly quickly, and the amount of nervousness the holiday brings a good deal of people into the doldrums.

                Rather than offer some cheery eyed version of Christmas, as a wonderful holiday, the album serves as a reminder of the contemplative nature of the holiday, from “O Tannenbaum” to the sweet “My Little Drum” which has one of the nicest flourishes of sound about a third of the way in.

                I’m reminded of New York heavily whenever this is played. I don’t know why, it feels like a very specific type of New York to me. How quiet and unobtrusive the music is, how innocent the singers are for the hallmark song “Christmas Time is here”. The languid pace helps things as well, allowing this to be the perfect album for standing on a street corner eating roasted chestnuts.

                You could do no better than this wonderful gem of an album to adorn your holidays.