Mayo Thompson – Corky’s Debt to His Father 8.4

Admittedly, I’m a huge Mayo Thompson fan. Each  time I learn something new about him, it is always a good thing, like he  took part in more art movements than I originally realized. Or how he  threw crazy parties, taught art, lived in Scotland and California, etc.  Here  we have a more straightforward release of his. Lacking any of what made  Red Krayola so difficult, this is a good place to start with his  strange body of work. A competent band backs him, with a good amount of  flair. They are able to follow his erratic story-telling delivery.  Don’t  worry; this won’t exactly be bland, radio-friendly fare. “Oyster Thins”  is an early highlight. With multiple parts, he slowly builds up. That  organ compliments the goofy nature of his lyrics. Often it feels like  the song will collapse, but doesn’t. He makes it appear as if it will  multiple times throughout the song, allowing the listener to be confused  by something besides the lyrics. “Horses”  brings the most triumphant part of the whole album. What he’s so  excited should remain a mystery. The whimsy he brings to each song,  through the slightly off arrangements and storytelling makes it  ultimately worth it, particularly the proclamation of how worried he is  on “Worried Worried” a very sweet closer. Overall, I wish more people gave this guy a chance. He embodies all that’s good with Texas art students.

Mayo Thompson – Corky’s Debt to His Father 8.4

Admittedly, I’m a huge Mayo Thompson fan. Each time I learn something new about him, it is always a good thing, like he took part in more art movements than I originally realized. Or how he threw crazy parties, taught art, lived in Scotland and California, etc.
Here we have a more straightforward release of his. Lacking any of what made Red Krayola so difficult, this is a good place to start with his strange body of work. A competent band backs him, with a good amount of flair. They are able to follow his erratic story-telling delivery.
Don’t worry; this won’t exactly be bland, radio-friendly fare. “Oyster Thins” is an early highlight. With multiple parts, he slowly builds up. That organ compliments the goofy nature of his lyrics. Often it feels like the song will collapse, but doesn’t. He makes it appear as if it will multiple times throughout the song, allowing the listener to be confused by something besides the lyrics.
“Horses” brings the most triumphant part of the whole album. What he’s so excited should remain a mystery. The whimsy he brings to each song, through the slightly off arrangements and storytelling makes it ultimately worth it, particularly the proclamation of how worried he is on “Worried Worried” a very sweet closer.
Overall, I wish more people gave this guy a chance. He embodies all that’s good with Texas art students.
  1. beachsloth posted this