this is what it feels like to be a precocious teen in the early 21st century. By Ben Shear 

               Ben Shear appreciates the Sun chandelier. People usually refer to the Sun simply as ‘the Sun’ or the more formal ones use the Sun’s full name ‘Mr. Golden Sun’. Everything is scorched by Mr. Golden Sun in the city. Cities are made for this look. Giant slabs of concrete, a lack of trees, costly living conditions yet people still flock to them. It makes no sense. While Ben sweats out he sees a flower. The purple flower gives him hope. Among all the grayness of the urban life the purple flower beats all odds to bloom in a dark place. 

                The analysis of the poem comes next. The poem was originally homage to ‘Sunflower Sutra’ an Allen Ginsberg piece, Ben abandons that idea. Allen Ginsberg has enough homage. Honestly Allen Ginsberg receives respect all the time. Eventually Ben Shear must have seen James Franco’s homage to Allen Ginsberg in ‘Howl’ and decided ‘Eh whatever, I like flowers’. Instability appears to be a major part of the perfect poem. Flowers deserve the attention. Some of the most famous poems often deal with flowers. One of the most famous poems, the whole ‘Roses are red’ poem deals with this theme of immortality through its epic deeply metaphysical lines of ‘Roses are red (indicating a blushing sensation), violets are blue (indicating a severe depression that needs some sort of alleviation), sugar is sweet (giving the listener a form of anticipation) and so are you (indicating the listener is a worthwhile member of the human race). Ben Shear’s poem deals with a more unstable thing, with a grasp on the Earth that is tenuous due to the protagonist’s location in the city. 

                Gigolos and juggalos are one of the same. Juggalos sing of ‘getting down with the clowns’. Hook-up culture within the juggalo subculture is well-established. Many juggalos enjoy getting down. Without hooking up with other juggalos where else would juggalos ‘get some’? Conversion to the juggalo lifestyle is rather difficult. Not everyone is born to be a juggalo. Only a select few can really answer the cry of the clowns. From here Ben explores concepts of violence. Thanks to violence millions of pumpkins are cruelly destroyed for little to no reason. Teenage angst destroys much more than pumpkins however. Due to teenage angst millions of otherwise fine objects are ruined. 

                ‘Nirvana (can I have a hug)’ expresses a different emotion. This represents the simultaneous hurt and anger of being a teenager. Aging ruins the angst and reveals it to be tremendously sad. When one goes through the hurt of being a teenager there’s no one to speak to about it. Only after the moment has passed do people speak about it. Being a teenager hurts for reasons that few understand, as each generation suffers from new problems and finds new solutions. Ben Shear understands this, the pain of growing up. And that is a beautiful thing.

this is what it feels like to be a precocious teen in the early 21st century. By Ben Shear

               Ben Shear appreciates the Sun chandelier. People usually refer to the Sun simply as ‘the Sun’ or the more formal ones use the Sun’s full name ‘Mr. Golden Sun’. Everything is scorched by Mr. Golden Sun in the city. Cities are made for this look. Giant slabs of concrete, a lack of trees, costly living conditions yet people still flock to them. It makes no sense. While Ben sweats out he sees a flower. The purple flower gives him hope. Among all the grayness of the urban life the purple flower beats all odds to bloom in a dark place. 

                The analysis of the poem comes next. The poem was originally homage to ‘Sunflower Sutra’ an Allen Ginsberg piece, Ben abandons that idea. Allen Ginsberg has enough homage. Honestly Allen Ginsberg receives respect all the time. Eventually Ben Shear must have seen James Franco’s homage to Allen Ginsberg in ‘Howl’ and decided ‘Eh whatever, I like flowers’. Instability appears to be a major part of the perfect poem. Flowers deserve the attention. Some of the most famous poems often deal with flowers. One of the most famous poems, the whole ‘Roses are red’ poem deals with this theme of immortality through its epic deeply metaphysical lines of ‘Roses are red (indicating a blushing sensation), violets are blue (indicating a severe depression that needs some sort of alleviation), sugar is sweet (giving the listener a form of anticipation) and so are you (indicating the listener is a worthwhile member of the human race). Ben Shear’s poem deals with a more unstable thing, with a grasp on the Earth that is tenuous due to the protagonist’s location in the city. 

                Gigolos and juggalos are one of the same. Juggalos sing of ‘getting down with the clowns’. Hook-up culture within the juggalo subculture is well-established. Many juggalos enjoy getting down. Without hooking up with other juggalos where else would juggalos ‘get some’? Conversion to the juggalo lifestyle is rather difficult. Not everyone is born to be a juggalo. Only a select few can really answer the cry of the clowns. From here Ben explores concepts of violence. Thanks to violence millions of pumpkins are cruelly destroyed for little to no reason. Teenage angst destroys much more than pumpkins however. Due to teenage angst millions of otherwise fine objects are ruined. 

                ‘Nirvana (can I have a hug)’ expresses a different emotion. This represents the simultaneous hurt and anger of being a teenager. Aging ruins the angst and reveals it to be tremendously sad. When one goes through the hurt of being a teenager there’s no one to speak to about it. Only after the moment has passed do people speak about it. Being a teenager hurts for reasons that few understand, as each generation suffers from new problems and finds new solutions. Ben Shear understands this, the pain of growing up. And that is a beautiful thing.

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