The Wolf at the Door by Rebecca Curtis
                Rebecca Curtis works an ordinary office job like any other person. Staying too late, burning that midnight oil in spite of ever-rising oil prices, Rebecca is a model employee. Unfortunately she makes a fatal mistake in her other diligent work. By going to the ‘off-limits’ bathroom she fails to adhere to the rules. Every office has that ‘good’ bathroom where the higher up people go to, going to the bathroom listening to Schubert, theirs is a life well-heeded. Trickle-down economics begins in bathrooms. Giving the lower echelons of workers something to really cherish, like a bathroom with working soap dispensers and towels, is the first step towards a happy productive workforce. 
                Home after a long day at work Rebecca is ready to sit down and relax with her beloved family. A wolf comes to the door. Before Rebecca can drink that cool refreshing taste of Coors Lite she must fight off a wolf. The wolf is persistent. Unlike Rebecca the wolf has quite a nice car. Next to the wolf is his bored girlfriend waiting for some sweet Rebecca to eat. Actually this part of the story appears to be patently untrue. Wolves rarely if ever attack humans. Fatalities from wolf attacks in the US are extremely low. Plus wolves generally lack the income flow to purchase expense imported luxury automobiles. In fact Rebecca has more of wolf personality, running home, peeing loudly, all wolf sorts of things. 
                A military complex is lucky enough to have Rebecca as a faithful worker. The lights are turned off on her, somewhat unfairly. Perhaps if Rebecca had noticed the lights she might not have encountered the wolf problem. And the wolf is a strong beast. Rebecca begs her sister to get a knife, any knife but the plea falls on deaf ears. This nasty wolf has been bothering them for a while. What happens to its victims is left unsaid. If Rebecca needs a knife the assumption should be something bad. Fortunately things work out a little bit for Rebecca. Not in the ‘her life was forever saved’ but more in the dissatisfaction that the wolf encounters. Being a wolf is a terrible job, perhaps worse than office work. 
                By the end the wolf is revealed to be a somewhat lonely creature with considerable pockets. Alone in its wealth the wolf cannot interact with people in any other way but violence. In other words the wolf is probably a card-carrying Republican just trying to ruin people’s lives in a more visceral, literal way. Rebecca does the right thing. She reinforces the loneliness of the wolf.

The Wolf at the Door by Rebecca Curtis

                Rebecca Curtis works an ordinary office job like any other person. Staying too late, burning that midnight oil in spite of ever-rising oil prices, Rebecca is a model employee. Unfortunately she makes a fatal mistake in her other diligent work. By going to the ‘off-limits’ bathroom she fails to adhere to the rules. Every office has that ‘good’ bathroom where the higher up people go to, going to the bathroom listening to Schubert, theirs is a life well-heeded. Trickle-down economics begins in bathrooms. Giving the lower echelons of workers something to really cherish, like a bathroom with working soap dispensers and towels, is the first step towards a happy productive workforce. 

                Home after a long day at work Rebecca is ready to sit down and relax with her beloved family. A wolf comes to the door. Before Rebecca can drink that cool refreshing taste of Coors Lite she must fight off a wolf. The wolf is persistent. Unlike Rebecca the wolf has quite a nice car. Next to the wolf is his bored girlfriend waiting for some sweet Rebecca to eat. Actually this part of the story appears to be patently untrue. Wolves rarely if ever attack humans. Fatalities from wolf attacks in the US are extremely low. Plus wolves generally lack the income flow to purchase expense imported luxury automobiles. In fact Rebecca has more of wolf personality, running home, peeing loudly, all wolf sorts of things. 

                A military complex is lucky enough to have Rebecca as a faithful worker. The lights are turned off on her, somewhat unfairly. Perhaps if Rebecca had noticed the lights she might not have encountered the wolf problem. And the wolf is a strong beast. Rebecca begs her sister to get a knife, any knife but the plea falls on deaf ears. This nasty wolf has been bothering them for a while. What happens to its victims is left unsaid. If Rebecca needs a knife the assumption should be something bad. Fortunately things work out a little bit for Rebecca. Not in the ‘her life was forever saved’ but more in the dissatisfaction that the wolf encounters. Being a wolf is a terrible job, perhaps worse than office work. 

                By the end the wolf is revealed to be a somewhat lonely creature with considerable pockets. Alone in its wealth the wolf cannot interact with people in any other way but violence. In other words the wolf is probably a card-carrying Republican just trying to ruin people’s lives in a more visceral, literal way. Rebecca does the right thing. She reinforces the loneliness of the wolf.

  1. beachsloth posted this