LOG by NAP



               Ah yes it is the state fair all over again. The log rollers keep on going. They aren’t poets but they know about nature. Or they know about nature before they remove it. They wear hoods as they bring it down with mighty arms swinging. 

                Courtney Hitson watches her young students grow up. Mortality encroaches on their life. Things happen like this all the time. Leaves bring the sense of sadness too. Poor dead bird lies in a pile of other dead things. Welcome to autumn. Autumn is bleak. 

                Tammy-Ho Lai-Ming feels up a tree. Is feeling up trees foreplay to ax play? Poor trees get torn down all the danged time. Every swipe of the ax hurts the poor tree. Yet they get a release, they can perhaps see their tree offspring that they’ve never met as they are latched onto the back of trucks for the last time. While she feels the tree she thinks of all the weird things in nature. Snow is a weird thing. Snow makes no sense. Snow is the cold crying out lifeless tears. 

                Neal Kitterlin praises. What does praise mean to anybody? It is amorphous. At first it gives people a sense of purpose. However there’s nothing to trade praise in for except more praise. After a while the praise becomes a self-perpetuating cycle. That’s how religions start. One guy’s a good guy; everybody else praises that guy wanting to be that guy. Not everyone is meant to be a good person. There’s going to be bad people too. Insects want to be friends, to get a little blood. Mosquitos want to be close. Humans crush them for that very reason. 

                Deanna Masselli notices the alligators. They aren’t like hungry hungry hippos. This is real. Poor Deanna forsakes her mother to the hungry alligator, the yuppies of the swamps. All they want is to have friends, to eat people. It is a simple life in the swamps. 

                Roberto Montes mentions the entire flora in life. Flora gives the world color. Thanks to its beauty it has its life cut short. This is the reward things get for supporting others without any praise to keep. Of course life is short for flora. Most of it is seasonal, blooming in all the right places, blooming at all the right times. Without flora there would be no reason for the seasons. 

                Ken Poyner hangs out in the suburbs. America gets more nature from the suburbs than from any other source. Without the suburbs people wouldn’t even know anything about grass. This is what happens when lawn worship becomes a living, breathing thing. Carpooling is a large part of the suburbs. It is an attempt to be environmentally friendly in an area that’s the antithesis of environmental friendliness. 

                Jesse Prado sees the seedy underbelly of America’s airline industry. Life is boring enough to watch airplanes take off. This is the nature of Oakland, of California. People have all these places to go. While they are in metal tubes they see fly over country since the pilots inform them of various geological features. There are the Rocky Mountains. There is the Mississippi. Roughly 15% of all plane riders bother even turning their head. 

                Matt Rowan acknowledges the death of a tree. He tries to figure it out. Matt is no Sherlock Holmes; he can’t discover the cause of death for the tree. It wasn’t progress thankfully. Stumps are the zits of progress as progress goes through adolescence. 

                Paige Taggart braves the sea. Old crusty people live in the sea. They prefer to be called ‘barnacles’. They live on the bottoms of ships, trying to get free rides all the time. Accents exist in these strange places. Nobody knows where they came from but they are attractive. Maybe there’s a certain sense of ‘cool they can do it on their own’ that is long gone. Now everybody is together. Sea hermit crabs take care of their boats and feel their age slipping away. 

                David Tomaloff crushes it into a complete and thorough ending. He follows a dragonfly. Death surrounds him. Nature is big into death. Without death nature would be pretty boring. Humanity likes a good death every now and then. 

                LOG is the most nature-orientated thing NAP has ever done. For a website that offers PDFs all the time they are changing up the game. This may be the closest the internet has gotten to nature since tweetdeck.

LOG by NAP

               Ah yes it is the state fair all over again. The log rollers keep on going. They aren’t poets but they know about nature. Or they know about nature before they remove it. They wear hoods as they bring it down with mighty arms swinging. 

                Courtney Hitson watches her young students grow up. Mortality encroaches on their life. Things happen like this all the time. Leaves bring the sense of sadness too. Poor dead bird lies in a pile of other dead things. Welcome to autumn. Autumn is bleak. 

                Tammy-Ho Lai-Ming feels up a tree. Is feeling up trees foreplay to ax play? Poor trees get torn down all the danged time. Every swipe of the ax hurts the poor tree. Yet they get a release, they can perhaps see their tree offspring that they’ve never met as they are latched onto the back of trucks for the last time. While she feels the tree she thinks of all the weird things in nature. Snow is a weird thing. Snow makes no sense. Snow is the cold crying out lifeless tears. 

                Neal Kitterlin praises. What does praise mean to anybody? It is amorphous. At first it gives people a sense of purpose. However there’s nothing to trade praise in for except more praise. After a while the praise becomes a self-perpetuating cycle. That’s how religions start. One guy’s a good guy; everybody else praises that guy wanting to be that guy. Not everyone is meant to be a good person. There’s going to be bad people too. Insects want to be friends, to get a little blood. Mosquitos want to be close. Humans crush them for that very reason. 

                Deanna Masselli notices the alligators. They aren’t like hungry hungry hippos. This is real. Poor Deanna forsakes her mother to the hungry alligator, the yuppies of the swamps. All they want is to have friends, to eat people. It is a simple life in the swamps. 

                Roberto Montes mentions the entire flora in life. Flora gives the world color. Thanks to its beauty it has its life cut short. This is the reward things get for supporting others without any praise to keep. Of course life is short for flora. Most of it is seasonal, blooming in all the right places, blooming at all the right times. Without flora there would be no reason for the seasons. 

                Ken Poyner hangs out in the suburbs. America gets more nature from the suburbs than from any other source. Without the suburbs people wouldn’t even know anything about grass. This is what happens when lawn worship becomes a living, breathing thing. Carpooling is a large part of the suburbs. It is an attempt to be environmentally friendly in an area that’s the antithesis of environmental friendliness. 

                Jesse Prado sees the seedy underbelly of America’s airline industry. Life is boring enough to watch airplanes take off. This is the nature of Oakland, of California. People have all these places to go. While they are in metal tubes they see fly over country since the pilots inform them of various geological features. There are the Rocky Mountains. There is the Mississippi. Roughly 15% of all plane riders bother even turning their head. 

                Matt Rowan acknowledges the death of a tree. He tries to figure it out. Matt is no Sherlock Holmes; he can’t discover the cause of death for the tree. It wasn’t progress thankfully. Stumps are the zits of progress as progress goes through adolescence. 

                Paige Taggart braves the sea. Old crusty people live in the sea. They prefer to be called ‘barnacles’. They live on the bottoms of ships, trying to get free rides all the time. Accents exist in these strange places. Nobody knows where they came from but they are attractive. Maybe there’s a certain sense of ‘cool they can do it on their own’ that is long gone. Now everybody is together. Sea hermit crabs take care of their boats and feel their age slipping away. 

                David Tomaloff crushes it into a complete and thorough ending. He follows a dragonfly. Death surrounds him. Nature is big into death. Without death nature would be pretty boring. Humanity likes a good death every now and then. 

                LOG is the most nature-orientated thing NAP has ever done. For a website that offers PDFs all the time they are changing up the game. This may be the closest the internet has gotten to nature since tweetdeck.

  1. infinitegestures reblogged this from beachsloth and added:
    I love Sloth love.
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