The Fucked Up Beat – Chronopolis 7.5   

                The Fucked Up Beat creates noir industrial landscapes in its two extended pieces on   Chronopolis. ‘Chronopolis’ appears to be well-named, as both pieces display a certain urban unease. Beats do exist, but more as a form of atmosphere. Melodies found within these two large slabs of sound are rather cryptic, and often fleeting beneath many layers of murk.

                ‘Chronopolis I’ initially starts off as rather positive before venturing into darker terrain. How this evolves is fascinating. The melody takes on a dreamier approach before it becomes fully disconnected from its happier origins. Eventually it becomes an anxious form of jazz. Going through the piece one discovers fragments of melodies, movement, and near-grooves. Finally the entire thing collapses in a series of overwhelming bass and static blasts. I enjoy how the instability of the piece eventually crashes into a satisfying collusion. 

                 ‘Chronopolis III’ has recognizable beats. This is the more-rhythm, pulse orientated track of the bunch. At times it feels almost kraut-rock like, particularly in the center of the track. A faint melody appears at certain parts of the track. That makes it considerably more approachable than the nearly thirty minute epic ‘Chronopolis I’.  
 
                Overall, this is a big step forward for Eddie J. Palmer, of ‘Happiness in Aeroplanes’ fame. I have heard some of his previous work, showing a clear path towards this sort of sound, but never before has it showed quite so sure of itself. Perhaps collaborator Brett Zehner has a bit to do with the pacing, and with the long nature of the work. These two pieces are perfect for getting lost in while traveling late at night on the train.

The Fucked Up Beat – Chronopolis 7.5   

                The Fucked Up Beat creates noir industrial landscapes in its two extended pieces on Chronopolis. ‘Chronopolis’ appears to be well-named, as both pieces display a certain urban unease. Beats do exist, but more as a form of atmosphere. Melodies found within these two large slabs of sound are rather cryptic, and often fleeting beneath many layers of murk.

                ‘Chronopolis I’ initially starts off as rather positive before venturing into darker terrain. How this evolves is fascinating. The melody takes on a dreamier approach before it becomes fully disconnected from its happier origins. Eventually it becomes an anxious form of jazz. Going through the piece one discovers fragments of melodies, movement, and near-grooves. Finally the entire thing collapses in a series of overwhelming bass and static blasts. I enjoy how the instability of the piece eventually crashes into a satisfying collusion. 

                 ‘Chronopolis III’ has recognizable beats. This is the more-rhythm, pulse orientated track of the bunch. At times it feels almost kraut-rock like, particularly in the center of the track. A faint melody appears at certain parts of the track. That makes it considerably more approachable than the nearly thirty minute epic ‘Chronopolis I’.  

 

                Overall, this is a big step forward for Eddie J. Palmer, of ‘Happiness in Aeroplanes’ fame. I have heard some of his previous work, showing a clear path towards this sort of sound, but never before has it showed quite so sure of itself. Perhaps collaborator Brett Zehner has a bit to do with the pacing, and with the long nature of the work. These two pieces are perfect for getting lost in while traveling late at night on the train.

  1. beachsloth posted this